April 27, 2019

Calendar

Aug
22
Thu
Sasol New Signatures Art @ Pretoria Art Museum
Aug 22 @ 10:00 am – Sep 29 @ 5:00 pm

Sometimes it’s the smallest things that have the greatest effect. From the invisible molecules that make up the paint adorning a canvas, to the undiscovered artist who captivates audiences with a unique and inspiring masterpiece – this is your time to be noticed.

Art plays an important part in the cultural fabric of our nation and competitions serve to encourage greater creativity across age, gender and education, as well as to acknowledge the wealth of talent that we have in our country.

We recognize that art is one of the most fundamental expressions of human behaviour, and Sasol has thus been assembling a collection of contemporary South African art since the 1960’s.

The collection came about through the efforts of former Sasol Chairman, Johannes Stegmann, who worked tirelessly to assemble a collection that gives enjoyment, inspires, enriches, and occasionally perplexes.  His influence began a period of many years where talented young South Africans were given the opportunity to excel in the visual and performing arts.

According to Stegmann,”What touches the spirit of man more than art?  From the earliest times, it was literature, music and the visual arts which distinguished man from other beings.  Art is a mystery which communicates through languages which cannot easily be translated into words.  Art is also often controversial, especially when it is contemporary. “

The Sasol New Signatures competition has been a platform for promoting emerging artists and their work to the art loving public at large.  Many of the works now have a proud place in the Sasol art collection.

Visiting Hours and Admission Fees:

Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 – 17:00

Closed on Mondays and Public Holidays
Closed on Easter weekend

Admission:

Adult R25
Pensioners: R12
Learners: R7

Pre-booked guided tours for Learners:
R22,00 per learner (entrance fee included)

Pre-booked guided tours for students:
R42,00 per student (entrance fee included)

Sep
20
Fri
Gauteng International Arts Festival 2019 @ City of Tshwane
Sep 20 @ 8:00 am – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

Announcing the 4th Gaufestival within the City of Tshwane.
20 September – 6 October

www.gaufestival.com/calendar/

An exciting international and local community project, which was launched 2016 in the City of Tshwane.

The principal motivation for establishing such a festival was to promote Tshwane as an international tourist attraction. Few people realize that the Voortrekker Monument is the 2nd most visited tourist attraction in South Africa after the Cape Town Waterfront.

International visitors land up staying in Johannesburg as a matter of course, pay a day visit to the Monument and miss out on so much else on offer within the city of Tshwane.

Tshwane is the ideal metropole to host a festival, bearing in mind the various embassies, from all over the world extant within the city boundaries.

With phenomenal growth over the past 3 years, great excitement reigns for the coming Gaufestival. 

The Gaufestival was registered as a Non-Profit-Organization and was launched in 2016 within various venues in Tshwane. The parties on board are City of Tshwane, Brooklyn Theatre, various theatres,  TTA – Tshwane Tourism Association, Art galleries and a host of community projects. 

The City of Tshwane is on board as the official host city of the festival. The municipality fully supports the festival on various levels with staff involved in administration, organization and in-house funding. 

The engine room for the entire Gaufestival is at Brooklyn Theatre. The office can be contacted telephonically during business hours, for any queries.

CONCERTS

Entertainment forms the backbone of any festival worth its salt. 

Exciting events are lined up at a variety of excellent venues all over Tshwane. From the most intimate chamber recitals to huge picnic concerts in the outdoors. Collaboration with international embassies has resulted in top class Classical and World Music artists from different countries performing at the Gaufestival. 

VENUES

Voortrekker Monument – Main Arena & State Theatre

Menlyn Maine – Sun Arena

Atterbury Theatre

Brooklyn Theatre

State Theatre

012 Central – Pretoria CBD

Dinokeng Game Reserve

Park Acoustics

VISUAL ARTS

Also under the Gaufestival umbrella we find the following Art Galleries who have come on board with special exhibitions. 

Brooklyn Theatre – CANSA Gallery

Pretoria Art Museum

Pretoria Association of the Arts

Alliance Francaise

Voortrekker Monument

ARTS & CRAFTS

Arts & Crafts at Greenlyn

Morning and night markets during the festival. 

FOOD

Hazelfood Market

An international food market with an excellent variety of cuisine for everyone on Saturdays at Greenlyn Village. 

EDUCATION

The Gaufestival is pre-empted with a whole week of OUTREACH endeavours. 

The City of Tshwane assists with transport for children to visit final rehearsals and other activities. 

COMMUNITY AND CONSERVATION:

The Dendrological society – National Arbour Day is celebrated with annual tree planting at Greenlyn Village during the Gaufestival.

HEALTH

After serious negotiations over the past 3 years, to get a substantial health element on board for the festival, this has become a reality with the Chamberlain’s Capital Classic Fun Run, which will now

become part of the 2019 GauFestival. 

MARKETING

Access to the full database of the City of Tshwane, as well as all the various venues, galleries, embassies etc. will contribute to promote the festival. 

Several international embassies are already on board to promote the festival also via tour operators. 

APPLICATIONS

Applications for participation in the 2019 festival are already open on the festival website. 

CELEBRATE OUR CITY

The Gaufestival falls within the most beautiful month of the year in Tshwane with the Jacarandas in full bloom, literally drawing hundreds of international tourists to the city to experience the splendour of it all. 

Let us endeavour to keep these visitors for longer the merely one day so that the entire city can benefit from this. 

The Gauteng Festival logo with its colourful umbrella stands for ‘INCLUSION’ of EVERYONE in Tshwane. 

This is a brilliant opportunity to market our beautiful city locally and abroad and last but not least create many job opportunities and hopefully much pleasure to everyone who will be attending this festival.

 

Pierneef Exhibition @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 20 @ 8:00 am – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

Pierneef Exhibition
Voortrekker Monument
20 September – 6 October
only open Monday to Friday 09:00 – 17:00

Details will follow soon.

Opening on 5 September.

Jacobus Hendrik (Henk) Pierneef (usually referred to as Pierneef) (13 August 1886 Pretoria – 4 October 1957 Pretoria), was a South African landscape artist, generally considered to be one of the best of the old South African masters. His distinctive style is widely recognised and his work was greatly influenced by the South African landscape.

Most of his landscapes were of the South African highveld, which provided a lifelong source of inspiration for him. Pierneef’s style was to reduce and simplify the landscape to geometric structures, using flat planes, lines and colour to present the harmony and order in nature. This resulted in formalised, ordered and often-monumental view of the South African landscape, uninhabited and with dramatic light and colour.

Pierneef’s work can be seen worldwide in many private, corporate and public collections, including the Africana Museum, Durban Art Gallery, Johannesburg Art Gallery, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, Pierneef Museum and the Pretoria Art Gallery.

Entrance to site: (valid from 1 March 2019) – Facilities are all wheel chair accessible

GPS Coordinates: -25.776372, 28.175985 (Only correct on Google)

  • Busses: R 100
  • Mini-busses: R60
  • Heritage Levy: R15
  • Researchers and library: R50 per person
  • Friends of the Monument – free, passengers pay entrance fee 

    Annual (Friends of the Voortrekker Monument only) Click here to apply

Entrance fees

  • Adults: R 90
  • SA Scholars (without guides): R 45
  • SA Scholars (with guides): R 60 (See Educational Tours for Schools & Youth Organisations Click here)
  • Families (parent/s with 3 own children under 18), vehicle included: Maximum R 180
    Friends of the Monument – free 
  • Guide fee: R400

Art Gallery

  • Included in tariffs above unless otherwise stated at main entrance or in the Events Programme

Visiting Hours (Monday to Sunday)

  • 1 May – 31 Aug: 08:00-17:00
  • 1 Sep – 30 April: 08:00-18:00
  • The Monument will be closed on 25 December. Bookings take place from Monday to Friday from 08:00 to 16:00. Please book weekend tours in advance.

Outrides on Horseback: Click here

Educational Tours for Schools & Youth Organisations Click here

To book an educational tour contact Daniel Mokwena: tel: [012] 326 6770 or e-mail klientediens@vtm.org.za

Historical, architectural and Art tours contact Daniel Mokwena: 012 326 6770 or klientediens@vtm.org.za

OTHER ACTIVITIES
Horse rides: 082 828 6323
Birthday parties with traditional activities : contact Daniel Mokwena

A STORY OF SOUTH AFRICAN ART | Ongoing | Albert Werth Hall @ Pretoria Art Museum
Sep 20 @ 10:00 am – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

A STORY OF SOUTH AFRICAN ART | Ongoing | Albert Werth Hall
20 September until 6 October

This selection of artworks from the permanent collection of the Pretoria Art Museum briefly reviews South African art. It includes works by early 20th century painters, the Resistance artists of the 1980s and artists of the 21st century. The exhibition is based on the secondary school syllabus, and the artworks are rotated regularly.

Visiting Hours and Admission Fees:

Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 – 17:00

Closed on Mondays and Public Holidays
Closed on Easter weekend

Admission:

Adult R25
Pensioners: R12
Learners: R7

Pre-booked guided tours for Learners:
R22,00 per learner (entrance fee included)

Pre-booked guided tours for students:
R42,00 per student (entrance fee included)

COROBRIK CERAMIC COLLECTION @ Pretoria Art Museum
Sep 20 @ 10:00 am – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

COROBRIK CERAMIC COLLECTION
Permanent display | Ceramic Gallery
20 September – 6 October

A selection of ceramics is on display, representing the development of studio ceramics and the work of traditional rural potters in South Africa over the past 30 years. Initially the collection was started by the Stellenbosch Farmers Winery, who in 1977 became the sponsors of APSA, now Ceramics Southern Africa, and purchased the winning pieces at the national and regional exhibitions. In 1982, Corobrik became the sponsor and acquired the collection. Since then numerous acquisitions from exhibitions and pieces contributed by members have been added to the collection.

Visiting Hours and Admission Fees:

Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 – 17:00

Closed on Mondays and Public Holidays
Closed on Easter weekend

Admission:

Adult R25
Pensioners: R12
Learners: R7

Pre-booked guided tours for Learners:
R22,00 per learner (entrance fee included)

Pre-booked guided tours for students:
R42,00 per student (entrance fee included)

“Youth Art Exhibition “ Meraki Art Gallery @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 20 @ 5:00 pm – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

“Youth Art Exhibition “ A collection of artworks by a
variety of young South African artists

20 September – 6 October

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

Carl Jeppe “Fractured land” @ Pretoria Arts Association
Sep 20 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

13 September 2019 to 2 October 2019

Carl Jeppe
“Fractured land”
An exhibition of paintings and charcoal drawings

Gallery Hours
Tuesday to Friday: 09h00 to 18h00
Saturday: 09h00 to 13h00
Sunday 6 October: 10h00 to 13h00

Mozart Piano Concerto No. 20 & 24 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

MOZART PIANO CONCERTOS
Gauteng Philharmonic Orchestra
World famous Japanese pianist Hiroaki Takenouchi
Bruno Campo (conductor)
Hiroaki Takenouchi (piano)
Daniël Spies (flute)

Friday 20 September 19:00
Sunday 22 September 15:00
at Brooklyn Theatre

The Gauteng Philharmonic is now an established professional orchestra, based at Brooklyn Theatre, Pretoria, for all of six years. The monthly concerts, feature the most popular symphonic repertoire, overtures and concertos for various solo instruments. Apart from the top class South African conductors and soloists, collaborations with international embassies, are a regular occurence, facilitating visits by outstanding musicians and conductors from abroad. This is all presented to the SA community by way of affordable ticket prices.

The opening concert of this year’s Gaufestival is a veritable feast of Mozart’s most attractive works. It opens with the evergreen Cosi fan tutte Overture followed by the romantic Andante for Flute & Orchestra featuring the brilliant young flautist, Daniël Spies (12) as soloist. Then follows the magical Piano Concerto no. 24 with Hiroaki Takenouchi behind the keys on the Brooklyn Theatre Steinway. After interval follows one Mozart’s shortest, yet most charming symphonies, namely the Symphony no. 23, also sometimes referred to as an Overture.

The final work on the programme is one of the Mozart’s best known piano concertos namely number Piano Concerto no. 20, with a slow movement much in the same league as the slow movement of the 21st Piano Concerto (Elvira Madigan Theme).

Programme:

Overture – Cosi fan tutte

Andante for Flute and Orchestra
Soloist: Daniël Spies

Piano Concerto no 24 in C minor

INTERVAL

Symphony no. 23

Piano Concerto no. 20 in D minor

Ticketprices: 

Block A (Adult) – R450Block B (Adult) – R360
Block A (Senior) – R400Block B (Senior)- R310
Block C (Row P, Q, R) – R180

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park



Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

Sep
21
Sat
ARTS AND CRAFTS AT GREENLYN @ Greenlyn Village Centre
Sep 21 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn – the Rainbow Country at its best!
Written by Prof. Piet Meiring

If you want to know a country and meet its people as they really are, go and find a street market in London, Amsterdam, Berlin or New York.  You will see it all, right before your eyes! It happens in South Africa as well.  Do you want to experience the Rainbow Country and its people, at their most festive and charming, make your way to the Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn, in Pretoria.

Entering the gates on a typical Saturday morning, you find yourself walking into a food market with stalls catering to every conceivable taste and thirst. The real treat, however, is wandering through the arts and crafts market, together with thousands of visitors, local as well as from overseas, discovering the beauty and the colours of South Africa.  Walking up and down the lanes – Pepper Lane, Willow Lane, Acacia Lane or Garden Route Lane – you may browse at more than seventy stalls. And the kids? Mom and Dad may drop them of at Piccolo Lane with its many games and famous water fountain – guaranteed to keep them out of trouble.

A wide variety of crafts from all over South Africa as well as from other African countries is on offer. While admiring the multi-coloured paintings and elegant sculptures, you may be able to talk to the artists themselves, who will gladly discuss their works with you. For the ladies and the girls there are gold jewellery to admire, together with colourful beadwork, copper bracelets, beautifully painted cloth, as well as hand crafted porcelain. And for the men and the boys there is a variety of home-made wooden guns and slings, leather work and exquisite, soft, Nguni-skin carpets. And, if you have to send a letter to your mother in law, paper made from elephant dung may come in handy! For the health-conscious, a number of stalls are devoted to herbs and medicines and creams, for every taste and every ill.

The heart of the market is the Brooklyn Theatre, where local as well as international artists regularly perform. The theatre and its productions are lauded by many as an important contributor the weekly South African musical calendar. Often on a Saturday morning visitors to the market are invited to a Limelight Concert, where budding artists and youth choirs demonstrate their skills during 20-40 minute programmes. The iSalon Music Shop, part of the theatre complex, boasts the largest selection of classical, popular-classical as well as Jazz CDs and DVDs. And if you are searching for sheet music or for instruments, from a simple recorder to a grand piano, this is the address you want.

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn is at the corner of Edison Street and Mc Kenzie Street in Brooklyn, in easy access from the main traffic arteries in Pretoria. The market is wheel chair-friendly and dogs (on leash) are welcome. Market hours are Saturdays from 08:00 till 14:00. Once every quarter an evening market is held as well.

For more information, please contact us by phone 060 976 8113 or by e-mail artsandcraftsatgreenlyn@gmail.com.

Liewe Loeloe en die Moenie-Boelie-Masjien! @ Pierneefteater
Sep 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am


Liewe Loeloe en die Moenie-Boelie-Masjien!
Teatermaters

PIERNEEFTEATER
Sa 21 en Ma 23 September 2019
10h00

Dis weer vakansietyd en Teatermaters is terug met ‘n splinternuwe avontuur in die Liewe Loeloe reeks. Ouma Dot het ‘n Moenie-Boelie-Masjien gebou vir die Vlakplaas Vaaljapies, Loeloe en Jorsie…want ‘n boelie is mos ‘n buffel wat ander maatjies karnuffel, hy swaai sy vuiste wild en woes en almal moet net buk en koes. Ouma Dot leer vir Loeloe en Jorsie hoe om van boelies soos Tommie Tergtand, Potjie Pootjie en Sarel Suurappel Swaaier lammetjies te maak. Loeloeraai, tiekiedraai, een twee drie en sê koebaai!

012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

R70 volwassenes / R60 kinders

ERFENISFEES by die Voortrekker Monument @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 21 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

ERFENISFEES by die Voortrekker Monument
Saterdag 21 September 09:00 – 15:00

Die Erfenisfees gaan ‘n heerlike gesinsdag vol interessante aktiwiteite en kultuurdemonstrasies wees. Ons gaan brood in die tradisionele bakoond bak, koffie brand, kerse giet, botter maak en swepe vleg.

Die Trekboervereniging bied weer ‘n tipiese Voortrekkeruitstalling met kakebeenwaens en pioniersgoedere op die “ou werf” naby die bakoonde aan, en daar is ook demonstrasies van smeewerk en voorlaaier skiet. Naas allerlei snuisterye, handwerk en boekkraampies, sal heerlike potjiekoskos, ingelegde produkte en tuisgemaakte happies te koop aangebied word. Kanon Susanna sal om 12:00 vreedsaam bulder en Nadine en Joe Voster sorg vir die musiekvermaak.

Die Antiemark is nou reeds veertien jaar oud en word beskou as die beste van sy soort in die land. Stalletjies is onbekombaar. Hulle is so skaars omdat uitstallers nie maklik van hulle staanplek afsien nie. Daar is tans 171 stalletjies wat ‘n verskeidenheid antiek- en versamelaarsitems verkoop. Besoekers kan ou erdeware, muntstukke, porselein, Dinky Toys, eetware, messe, juwele, glasware en nog baie meer op hierdie mark kry.

Daar is ‘n restaurant en verskeie kosstalletjies op die mark, asook parkering vir persone met rolstoele. Besoekers word gevra om asseblief nie hulle honde of ander troeteldiere saam te bring nie, aangesien die Monument in ‘n natuurreservaat geleë is.

Navrae aangaande die Antiekmark kan gerig word aan Geraldine Paulsen by 012 326 6770 of by bemarking@vtm.org.za. Navrae aangaande die Erfenisfees kan gerig word aan Thea Furstenburg by thea@vtm.org.za. Eeufees Rd, Groenkloof 358-Jr, Pretoria

PROGRAM

Erfenisfeesprogram – Amfi-dak

21 September 2019, 09:00 – 15:00

Aankondiger: Eugene van Heerden, Boeremusiekgilde

09:00 Fees open

Geniet ‘n verskeidenheid eetgoed en besigtig handgemaakte artikels by die feesstalletjies. Daar is ook potjiekos aan die prut by die Trekboervereniging se uitstalling!

09:00 – 14:00 Teken jou naam by die Voortrekkermonument fotostalletjie by die Ossewa aan,  vir ‘n kans om ‘n prys te wen!

09:00 – 15:00 Die Boeremusiekgilde begin musiek maak 

Noord-Wes Boere orkes, Piet Zwart en orkes, Willie Jooste en orkes, en Cassie Nel en orkes

09:00 – 15:00 Trekboervereniging demonstrasies

By die Trekboervereniging uitstalling, voor die Amfi-restaurant. Gaan kyk gerus na die verrigtinge en interessante demonstrasies van dié vereniging.

09:00 – 15:00 Jeugprogram / kinderaktiwiteite 

Voor die Amfi-restaurant. Treinritte, gesigverf, tombola, kettie-skiet en verf op klei.

09:30 – 10:00 Boeredanse deur die Wapadrand se Boeredansgroep

11:30 Afvuur van kanon Susanna saam met die Kanonvereniging van  Suid-Afrika 

12:00 – 13:00 Optrede gaskunstenaar: Jak de Priester

12:00 GROOT SKERM RUGBY  – Suid-Afrika teen Nieu-Seeland in die Amfi-restaurant

13:30 – 14:00 Volkspele deur die Magalies-Moot Volkspelelaer

14:00 Gelukkige Trekking

Voortrekkermonument stalletjie – die gelukkige trekking vir twee pryse vind plaas

15:00 Verrigtinge eindig

ALGEMENE TYE EN TARIEWE – Alle fasiliteite is rolstoel-vriendelik
GPS Koördinate: -25.776372, 28.175985 (Slegs korrek op Google)
Toegang tot terrein: (geldig van 1 Maart 2019)

Busse: R 100
Mini-busse: R60
Erfenisheffing: R15
Navorsers en biblioteek: R50 per persoon

Vriende van die Monument – gratis, passasiers betaal toegangsfooie
Jaarliks : (Slegs Vriende van die Voortrekkermonument) Kliek hier vir aansoekvorm

Volwassenes: R 90
SA Skoliere (sonder gidse): R 45
SA Skoliere (met gidse): R 60 (Sien Opvoedkundige dienste vir Skole en Jeugorganisasies Druk hier)

Gesin (ouer/s met 3 eie kinders onder 18), voertuig ingesluit: Maksimum R180
Gidsfooi: R400

Kunsgalery
Ingesluit by bostaande tensy anders by hoofingang of op gebeureprogram gespesifiseer.

Joy with Orff! – a showcase of Orff Schulwerk. {GauFestival} @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 21 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Press release for “Joy with Orff! – a showcase of Orff Schulwerk.”
21 September 11:00 at Brooklyn Theatre. 

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“Tell me, I forget, show me, I remember, involve me, I understand.  Since the beginning of time children have not liked to study. They would much rather play, and if you have their interests at heart, you will let them learn while they play; they will find that what they have mastered is child’s play.” Carl Orff

The Orff Schulwerk, or simply the Orff Approach, is a developmental approach used in music education. It is a creative process where music, movement, drama, and speech are combined into lessons that are similar to a child‘s world of play. It was developed by the German composer Carl Orff (1895–1982) and his colleague Gunild Keetman in the 1920s. Carl Orff worked until the end of his life to continue the development and spread of his teaching method. 

This production is a initiative of The Orff Schulwerk society of South-Africa.  It is meant to be a showcase of the Orff Schulwerk approach.  A few primary school Orff- ensembles will come together and perform, to show the richness of the wonderful thinking of Carl Orff.  Each of the groups will take you through the musical process of Orff Schulwerk. During this event the audience will also be invited to take part in the music making process. This is not a performance where the audience are passive observers, but rather an experience in the wonderful world of Orff Schulwerk. They will be able to make music themselves in their seats! This is a musical festival for both children on stage and the audience, experiencing the “Joy of Orff!”.

Ticket sales:

21 September 11:00

R50 per person

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

TRANSPORT TO THEATRE

  1. UBER
  2. GAUTRAIN Time table for SUNDAY concerts at 15:00
  3. DKS is an exclusive chauffeur service. Offering 24 Hour group or individual short or long distance transfers.
    www.dks.co.za
Opera Favourites – Loveline Foundation @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 21 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

OPERA FAVOURITES
Loveline Foundation
Sat. 21 Sept. 15:00 – 16:00

The Ensemble and guest performers will sing popular songs like Giacomo Puccini’s Nessun Dorma, Quando Men Vo, Going Home, Habanera, Some Enchanted Evening, Heimwee, Brindisi, Vilia Song, Mozart- O Isis und Osiris, Franz Lehar’s Lippen Schweigen, Guiseppe Verdi-Sempre Libera , Largo di Handel-Ombra mai fu, La Donna e Mobile, Song to the Moon and many more!

Ticket sales:

Saturday 21 September 15:00
R150 per person

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

 

Forever and ever. Demis Roussos tribute @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 21 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Forever and ever
Demis Roussos tribute with

Manuel Escorcio
Paul Ferreira (piano)

21 September – 18:00
22 September – 11:00

A concert to take you on a nostalgic trip down memory lane, as we recall the iconic, Egyptian-born Greek vocalist, Demis Roussos with hits like From Souvenirs to souvenirs, Goodbye my love, Lovely lady of Arcadia and My friend the wind.

Manuel Escorcio, the well loved South African tenor makes his debut for Salon Music in this charming production which features a selection of evergreen tunes and a celebration of the life of Demis Roussos, who passed away in 2015.

Ticketprices:

Saturday 21 September 18:00
Sunday 22 September 11:00

Block A (Adult) – R220
Block A (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R170
Block B (Adult) – R160
Block B (Senior(60+) / Student(21-))- R120
Block C – R120

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

HAZEL FOOD MARKET @ Greenlyn Village
Sep 21 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

At Hazel Food Market we continue to provide you with the best food products Pretoria has to offer and aim to always offer exciting new tastes to make your Saturday mornings something to look forward to.

 

Music from the Movies – Military Bands SANDF Combined (FORT SCHANSKOP) @ Fort Schanskop at Voortrekker Monument
Sep 21 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

MUSIC FROM THE MOVIES 
on a beautiful evening
Military bands SANDF combined

Saturday 21 September 17:00
Concert starts promptly at 19:00 until 21:00
Fort Schanskop
Voortrekker Monument & Nature Reserve

Come and enjoy a under the Stars concert at Fort Schanskop with the combined military bands of the SA Army, SA Air force and SA Military Health Services. Directed by Major Andrew Strugnell, Music Director of the National Ceremonial Guard-Sebokeng Complex

Programme:

SNItemComposerConductor
1.Universal Pictures FanfareVariousMaj A.C Strugnell
2.Night at the MoviesAlan SilvestriMaj A.C Strugnell
3.Symphonic Highlights from FrozenAnderson – LopezMaj A.C Strugnell
4.Highlights from the Lion KingHans ZimmerMaj L. Armer
5.Theme from Schindler’s ListJohn WilliamsMaj L. Armer
6.Disney at the OscarsVariousLt Col G. Seekola
7.Bohemian RhapsodyFreddy MercuryMaj L. Armer
8.BatmanDanny ElfmanMaj L. Armer
Interval30:00
9.Twentieth Century Fox FanfareAlfred NewmanLt Col G. Seekola
10.Bond James BondVariousLt Col G. Seekola
11.Beauty and the BeastMelkinLt Col G. Seekola
12.Moment for MorriconeEnnio MorriconeMaj A.C Strugnell
13.Pixar Movie MagicVariousMaj L. Armer
14.John Williams FantasyJohn WilliamsLt Col G. Seekola
15.Theme from Gabriel’s OboeEnnio MorriconeMaj A.C Strugnell
16.Pirates of the CaribbeanKlaus BedaltLt Col G. Seekola
17.This is me from the greatest ShowmanPaul and PasekMaj A.C Strugnell

Seating is on the grass under a huge thorn tree or on the amphitheatre stairs. The concert will take place between 19:00 and 21:00 and a shuttle bus service(available from 17:00 will be available between the parking area and the Fort before and after the concert. Food stalls and a cash bar will be provided from 17:00. More information on pre-bookings for food will be provided.

BRING own fold-up chairs and own blankets for the grass. 

Ticket Prices

Saturday 21 September From 17:00
Concert starts promptly at 19:00 until 21:00

Adults R150.00
Seniors: R120.00
Children: R 80.00

Booking via www.ticketspace.co.za

Click here to do an online booking

Telephonic bookings via 012-460-6033

CASH purchase on the concert date only. Book Now

Address:
Voortrekker Monument, Eeufees Road,
Groenkloof 358-Jr, Pretoria, 0027, South Africa

PRE-ORDER ‘n platter.

Pierre van Zyl
Tel 012 321 6270 / 71 / 73
Fax 0866 434 431

1.LARGE MIXED SAVOURY PLATTER: (100 Snacks per platter) R 700.00
4 Savoury Snacks, 3 Cold Meats & Cocktail Sandwiches (For 10 Persons)

2.SMALL MIXED SAVOURY PLATTER: (50 Snacks per platter) R 350.00
4 Savoury Snacks, 3 Cold Meats & Cocktail Sandwiches (For 5 Persons)

3.LARGE SWEET TREATS PLATTER: (100 Treats per platter) R 700.00
5 Different Sweet Treats (For 10 Persons)

4.SMALL SWEET TREATS PLATTER: (50 Treats per platter) R 350.00
5 Different Sweet Treats (For 5 Persons)

5.SMALL COLD MEAT PLATTER: (50 Pieces per platter) R 480.00
5 Assorted Cold Cuts (For 5 Persons)

6.CHEESE & OLIVES PLATTER: (60 Pieces per platter) R 570.00 (For 8 Persons). Assorted Cheeses, Hamrolls, Gherkins, Olives, Creamcheese & Bisbuits(For 6 Persons)

7.SMALL COCKTAIL SANDWICH PLATTER: (50 Samies per platter) R 350.00
Variety of Savoury Fillings on White & Brown Bread (For 5 Persons)

 

DISCLAIMER:
You enter the premises and surrounding facilities at your own risk. City of Tshwane and the GauFestival, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors and management will not be responsible for any death, loss, injury and / or damage of any nature whatsoever, irrespective how such death, loss, injury and / or damage occurs, regardless whether such death, loss, injury and / or damage is caused through any act or omission by City of Tshwane or the GauFestival cc, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors or management.

Sep
22
Sun
Forever and ever. Demis Roussos tribute @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Forever and ever
Demis Roussos tribute with

Manuel Escorcio
Paul Ferreira (piano)

21 September – 18:00
22 September – 11:00

A concert to take you on a nostalgic trip down memory lane, as we recall the iconic, Egyptian-born Greek vocalist, Demis Roussos with hits like From Souvenirs to souvenirs, Goodbye my love, Lovely lady of Arcadia and My friend the wind.

Manuel Escorcio, the well loved South African tenor makes his debut for Salon Music in this charming production which features a selection of evergreen tunes and a celebration of the life of Demis Roussos, who passed away in 2015.

Ticketprices:

Saturday 21 September 18:00
Sunday 22 September 11:00

Block A (Adult) – R220
Block A (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R170
Block B (Adult) – R160
Block B (Senior(60+) / Student(21-))- R120
Block C – R120

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

Mozart Piano Concerto No. 20 & 24 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 22 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

MOZART PIANO CONCERTOS
Gauteng Philharmonic Orchestra
World famous Japanese pianist Hiroaki Takenouchi
Bruno Campo (conductor)
Hiroaki Takenouchi (piano)
Daniël Spies (flute)

Friday 20 September 19:00
Sunday 22 September 15:00
at Brooklyn Theatre

The Gauteng Philharmonic is now an established professional orchestra, based at Brooklyn Theatre, Pretoria, for all of six years. The monthly concerts, feature the most popular symphonic repertoire, overtures and concertos for various solo instruments. Apart from the top class South African conductors and soloists, collaborations with international embassies, are a regular occurence, facilitating visits by outstanding musicians and conductors from abroad. This is all presented to the SA community by way of affordable ticket prices.  

The opening concert of this year’s Gaufestival is a veritable feast of Mozart’s most attractive works. It opens with the evergreen Cosi fan tutte Overture followed by the romantic Andante for Flute & Orchestra featuring the brilliant young flautist, Daniël Spies (12) as soloist. Then follows the magical Piano Concerto no. 24 with Hiroaki Takenouchi behind the keys on the Brooklyn Theatre Steinway. After interval follows one Mozart’s shortest, yet most charming symphonies, namely the Symphony no. 23, also sometimes referred to as an Overture. 

The final work on the programme is one of the Mozart’s best known piano concertos namely number Piano Concerto no. 20,  with a slow movement much in the same league as the slow movement of the 21st Piano Concerto (Elvira Madigan Theme). 

Programme:

Overture – Cosi fan tutte

Andante for Flute and Orchestra
Soloist: Daniël Spies

Piano Concerto no 24 in C minor

INTERVAL

Symphony no. 23

Piano Concerto no. 20 in D minor

Ticketprices: 

Block A (Adult) – R450Block B (Adult) – R360
Block A (Senior) – R400Block B (Senior)- R310
Block C (Row P, Q, R) – R180

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park



Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

Sep
23
Mon
Die Wetenskap van Kuns en Klank. Werkswinkel Kinders tussen die ouderdomme van 6 jaar en 12 jaar oud (graad R – graad 6/7) @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 23 @ 9:00 am – 12:30 pm

Die “Lig-Lug en Klank” vakansie werkswinkel het vir die eerste keer in Desember 2018 by die Brooklyn teater plaasgevind. Na groot belangstelling en navraag keer die werkswinkel terug met die klem op “Die Wetenskap van Kuns en Klank” (The Science of Art and Sound)

Dieselfde tema sal aangebied word vir onderskeidelik Engelse en Afrikaanse leerders. 

 

23 September 09:00-12:30 (Afrikaans)
23 September 14:00 – 17:30 (English)

Tydens hierdie 3 en `n half ure  gaan die jong kind unieke boublokke van Wetenskap, Kuns en Musiek op `n kreatiewe manier ervaar. Kinders tussen die ouderdomme van 6 jaar en 12 jaar oud (graad R – graad 6/7) word genooi om in te skryf en te registreer voor of op 20 September 2019. 

Die werkswinkel sal ingedeel word in afdelings van 45 /50 minute elk en elke kind kry die kans om die drie stasies van kuns, musiek en wetenskap te besoek en meer te leer, te bou, te ontdek, te speel, te verf, te maak en te eksperimenteer. Aanbieders van hierdie program sal bestaan uit Magdaleen Lamey (Musicula), Anna-Marie de Beer (Xperiland) en Zarien van Staden, Arbeidsterapeut en Kreatiewe leerspesialis.

Beperkte getalle(45 leerders) per sessie is beskikbaar, so skryf nou in om teleurstelling te voorkom.

Waar: Brooklyn Teater
Wat: “Die Wetenskap van Kuns en Klank” werkswinkel 
Wanneer: 23 September 2019
Tydsduur: 09:00 – 12:30 Afrikaans
                     14:00 – 17:30 Engels 
Koste per kind: R200 per sessie,  betaalbaar voor of op 20 September 2019

Verrassings wat wag: Spesiale Storie tyd, Teater Toer, Eksperimente: “hoor, vat, voel, sien en miskien ook proe!”

Bring saam: Eie kospakkie en water
of Bestel kospakkie by P.S. Delicious 062-226-5829 chef@psdelicious.co.za

Bespreek: Brooklyn Teater tel nr 012-460-6033

Bespreek op hierdie skakel

Na betaling, vul asseblief hierdie Google vorm in
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScF2UvvutJ9sYzay1zfZnIEntlp-vMuA-Z4Uu3XwVqr8o9B6w/viewform

Liewe Loeloe en die Moenie-Boelie-Masjien! @ Pierneefteater
Sep 23 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am


Liewe Loeloe en die Moenie-Boelie-Masjien!
Teatermaters

PIERNEEFTEATER
Sa 21 en Ma 23 September 2019
10h00

Dis weer vakansietyd en Teatermaters is terug met ‘n splinternuwe avontuur in die Liewe Loeloe reeks. Ouma Dot het ‘n Moenie-Boelie-Masjien gebou vir die Vlakplaas Vaaljapies, Loeloe en Jorsie…want ‘n boelie is mos ‘n buffel wat ander maatjies karnuffel, hy swaai sy vuiste wild en woes en almal moet net buk en koes. Ouma Dot leer vir Loeloe en Jorsie hoe om van boelies soos Tommie Tergtand, Potjie Pootjie en Sarel Suurappel Swaaier lammetjies te maak. Loeloeraai, tiekiedraai, een twee drie en sê koebaai!

012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

R70 volwassenes / R60 kinders

The Science of Art and Sound. Children aged between 6 years and 12 years (grade R grade 6/7) @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 23 @ 2:00 pm – 5:30 pm

In December 2018 the “Light, Air and Sound” holiday workshop was presented for the first time at Brooklyn Theatre. After many enquiries and much interest shown, the workshop returns with the accent on the science of art and sound.

The same theme will be presented for both the English and Afrikaans learners. Please enrol for the correct session.

23 September 09:00-12:00 (Afrikaans)
23 September 14:00 – 17:30 (English)

During these three and a half hours the young child will experience the unique building blocks of science, art and music in a creative manner. Children between the ages of 6 and 12 (grade R to grade 6/7) are invited to enrol and register before or on 20 September 2019.

The workshop will be divided into sections of 45 to 50 minutes each. Each child will have the opportunity to visit the three stations of art, music and science to learn, build, discover, play, paint, create and experiment. Presenters of this programme will be Magdaleen Lamey (Musicula), Anne-Marie de Beer (Xperiland) and Zarien van Staden, occupational therapist and creative learning specialist.
The numbers of learners are restricted to 45 per session. Enrol now to avoid disappointment.

Where: Brooklyn Theatre
What: “The Science of Art and Sound” workshop
When: 23 September 2019
Duration: 09:00 – 12:00 Afrikaans
14:00 – 17:30 English

Cost per child: R200 per session, payable before or on 20 September 2019
Surprises to look out for: Special story time, tour of the theatre, experiments: listen, touch, feel, see and maybe also taste!

Bring along: own food and water
Order special food or snack box from P.S. Delicious 062-226-5829 chef@psdelicious.co.za
Book: Brooklyn theatre tel. no. 012 460 6033
Bespreek op hierdie skakel

Please complete the following Google form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScF2UvvutJ9sYzay1zfZnIEntlp-vMuA-Z4Uu3XwVqr8o9B6w/viewform

NATANIËL – LENTEKOMBUIS @ Atterbury Theatre
Sep 23 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

NATANIËL – LENTEKOMBUIS
Monday 23 September 19:00
Atterbury Theatre

Is jou kookkunskreatiwiteit nog in sy winterhibernering vasgevang? Water jou mond by die gedagte aan ‘n vrolike gereg om die nuwe seisoen mee in te wy? Nataniël wys in Lentekombuis vir jou hoe om vinnige vrolike kos voor te berei wat jou gaste sal laat toustaan!

Tydens hierdie unieke kook-en-kletsgeleenthede staan hy letterlik op die verhoog en demonstreer eenvoudige dog smullekker geregte, terwyl hy die een spontane spitsvondigheid na die ander kwytraak.
Die resepte van die betrokke aand se seisoenkombuis is na die tyd in die voorportaal beskikbaar, en daarna ook op ons webwerf – deel dit met jou mense!

 

Is your culinary creativity still captured in its winter hibernation? Does your mouth water by the thought of a funky dish to kick off the new season? Nataniël shows in Lentekombuis how to prepare quick and quirky food that will make your guests queue at your front door for more!

During these unique “cooking and chatting” events, he literally stands on stage and demonstrates simple, yet delicious dishes, while he constantly chatters spontaneously in his trademark hilarious manner.
The recipes from the particular evening’s demonstrations are available in the foyer after the show, and thereafter also on our website – share it with your people!

MOZART COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS – HIROAKI TAKENOUCHI – CONCERT 1 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 23 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Hiroaki Takenouchi performs the
complete cycle of the Mozart Piano Sonatas.
5 concerts in collaboration with the Embassy of Japan in South Africa.

Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00; Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 & Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00
Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00; Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00

To experience live performances, featuring the entire set of 18 piano sonatas by Mozart, is extremely rare in international terms.Brooklyn Theatre is very proud to host this project with the world famous Japanese pianist, Hiroaki Takenouchi. This will be the first project of its kind in South African music history. Takenouchi has added an additional work to 3 of the performances to balance the recitals time-wise. These are: The Fantasy in C minor K.475, Rondo in A minor K.511 and the Adagio in B minor K. 540.

Takenouchi’s visit is a veritable feast of Mozart’s music, as he will also be performing two Mozart piano concertos with the GPO.

Concert 1 – Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Sonata No.1 in C K.279
Fantasy in C minor K.475
Sonata No.14 in C minor K.457
Sonata No.12 in F K.332
Sonata No.9 in D K.311

————————————————

Concert 2 – Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 – Book now

Sonata No.2 in F K.280
Sonata No.7 in C K.309
Sonata No.5 in G K.283
Sonata No.8 in A minor K.310

————————————————

Concert 3 – Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00 – Book now

Sonata No.3 in B flat K.281
Sonata No.10 in C K.330
Rondo in A minor K.511
Sonata No.11 in A K.331

————————————————

Concert 4 – Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00 – Book now

Sonata No.4 in E flat K.282
Sonata No.15 in F K.533/494
Sonata No.16 in C K.545
Sonata No.13 in B flat K.333

————————————————

Concert 5 – Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Adagio in B minor K.540
Sonata No.6 in D K.284
Sonata No.17 in B flat K.570
Sonata No.18 in D K.576

Ticket prices

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R160
Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R110

Brooklyn Theatre
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park
012-460-6033

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

—————————————————-

MOZART’S PIANO SONATAS

Daniel-Ben Pienaar

Enthusiastically championed by artists like Lily Krauss, derided by others, most notoriously Glenn Gould, Mozart’s piano sonatas occupy a special position in his output. Unlike Beethoven’s sonatas, these works are not central to their composer’s achievement. Nevertheless, they are unique as a polished body of works for a single instrument: and this is especially significant in Mozart’s case.

His contributions in all major genres are celebrated. In the great operatic comedies and the Singspiels he revels in the very artificiality of the stage to create real emotional states in his characters, and to portray true relationships. In the great concertos his piano soloist becomes an incandescent Everyman in the ‘social’ context of the individual wind instruments and the collective body of strings – quite unlike its often heroic, combative role in later concertos. In the late symphonies he finds an epic voice unimagined before in orchestral music, infusing exchanges of material and contrasts of mood with an apparently celebratory logic – a logic the essence of which remains elusive upon examination. The mature quintets and quartets, impassioned in unified sonority and expressive intent, are also exquisitely, graphically contrapuntal in the kaleidoscopic complexity of responses and reactions between and amongst the instruments. Throughout the large body of violin-and-piano sonatas a rapt dialogue between the I and the Other unfolds.

So, Mozart’s acute sensitivity to different instrumental and vocal timbres and his virtuosity at juxtaposing and reconciling the most unlikely materials in an apparently effortless and natural way, place him supreme as creator of characters – whether that be in his operas, or when he personifies instruments themselves. That is central to virtually all his greatest achievements. And it is obvious to even the naïve listener that dialogic interaction is crucial to the ebb and flow of the music – never more so than in the dramas, games and discourse of sonata.

Such dialogue can be heard in these piano sonatas too, but since Mozart cannot here characterise the instrument itself in the context of other instruments, he makes use of contrasts in dynamics, registers and textures to enable reference to other instrumental and vocal forces, and genres, enabling make-believe exchanges. By contrast, in the piano concertos, however varied the role of the piano may be, the soloist in that context has a unified identity, inevitably rendering the piano sonority more homogenous than should be the experience when listening to the works for piano alone.

Here, then, we find concentrations of symphonic material, or concerto tutti/solo duality and virtuoso passage work, or tender wind serenade exchanges, ardent string quartets: but we do so through musical simile. Simile rather than metaphor, since the paradox is that all this is cast in an eminently ‘pianistic’ idiom in a way which would resist effective transcription. Of course complex cross-reference like this abounds in Mozart’s language in general, but what is special about these works is that a single player has to vivify the implied exchanges between ‘instruments’ and ‘characters’ – and all in an unquestionably domestic or, at least intimate, setting. These works may at times refer to public styles of holding forth, or have large-scale implications by virtue of depth of content, but in their original instrumentation they demand quiet listening.

This leads to some difficult questions for those who wish to play the Mozart sonatas on a modern concert grand. Its identity as the vehicle of the recital and concerto virtuoso, its scale of sound and the way in which that sound is produced mean that every aspect of playing these works has to be re-imagined and re-invented. On the one hand, the pianist may have in mind the fortepiano in its private or concert setting, on the other the chamber, orchestral or vocal forces that are referred to. Thus he has the option to adopt an intimate voice – or not; but given the many contradictory qualities and capabilities of the modern piano, no obligation either way. It is so that even with the best translation much is lost, but if the translator is himself more than an artisan something new will be gained too. The performer might even want to approach these works with a completely anachronistic attitude, irrespective of what he knows about their intended instrumentation and frame of reference.

Moreover it is inescapable that the ways in which the concert grand speaks and sings and dances – its arts of voicing, pedalling, accentuation, touch, cantabile fully and shrewdly manipulated – were perfected through the nineteenth century: i.e. it is inescapable that a performance practice for these works that engages the instrument’s full expressive potential needs to look beyond easy categories of ‘authentic’, or ‘modern’ or ‘historically-informed’. One might say that, when a pianist immerses himself in this music, ‘interpretation’ is only one of many tools that he takes in hand, but by no means an accurate description of what he may fashion in the end.

These highly finished works, terse in utterance, even the more extensive amongst them generally only around twenty minutes in length, yet very rich in activity, rich in personality and topoi have, particularly in their fast movements, a nervous energy and intensity that is rarely heard in piano performances.

Friedrich Gulda’s recordings of ten sonatas are a notable exception; the Lily Krauss renditions are more cultured and varied but restless too in their quest for ever more nuances and surprises. But – this kind of wonderful unpredictability has generally not been evident in performances of these works. The development of the modern piano through the nineteenth century and, one has to concede, the impressive legacy of Beethoven’s sonatas with their robust treatment of the instrument, largely relegated Mozart’s solo piano works to the realm of pedagogy.

These days they are still used as a training ground for decoding, and learning reflex responses to the standard figurations of Viennese Classical music. It is not surprising that such treatment has engendered a ‘binary’ attitude to articulation and pulse in modern piano performances which rarely move beyond received notions. On sonorous concert instruments the relatively sparse textures of these works are treated with blanket restraint (presumably as an illustration that the performer is in command of the ‘style’), without the built-in tensions that render restraint powerful – producing precious, saccharine sonorities that project the music as no more than ‘antique’ art objects. Futhermore, the facile stereotype of Mozart as the epitome of elegance provides temptation for the pianist to perform the supposed seductive beauty of the music rather than its supposed character or feeling.

Two aspects of the scores are of special interest to pianists: ‘articulation’ marks, and dynamics markings. One of the pedagogical mores that also render the performance of these works didactic is an unimaginative, somewhat literalist approach to the slurs (‘bowings’) and different kinds of staccato marks that are found with unpredictable frequency on each page. The truth is that Mozart is anything but consistent with these markings – even to the extent that in some cases his quotation of the opening phrase of a work in his Thematic Catologue differs in these details from the autograph score. In any case, the way the modern instrument ‘speaks’ is so radically different from Mozart’s instruments that it is unthinkable that adherence to even a standardised style of articulation should ever take priority over the great varieties of touch and stress available to the pianist. Following from this it becomes imperative too to consider the implications for accentuation and emphasis of a fluent piano technique – kinetically very different from a fluent fortepiano technique.

Regarding dynamics one quickly observes that, in the first nine sonatas especially, Mozart somewhat obsessively marks, for the most part, f and p. Perhaps this is still, relatively early on in his career, a legacy of the less dynamically sensitive instruments he grew up with. Again, a literalist, binary reading can leave a somewhat blunt, unresponsive impression. However, the placement of these dynamics is extremely telling in that they very often imply phrasings and groupings that the notes on their own do not: more evidence of Mozart’s restless, ludic musical mind – relishing all types of assymetry – assymetry that seeks at least the illusion of clarification and balancing, thus propelling the music forward. A far cry from suavity on the one hand or prettiness on the other.

The piano sonatas fascinatingly oscillate between the domestic and the public, not only in their references, but – being by nature playful and thoughtful – also moving between that which includes the audience and that which does not. Vital is the image of the improviser/composer; so too the kind of open experimentation which is a result of abundant facility and an abundance of creativity.

Gulda provocatively posits that in the piano sonatas one finds ideas which, more or less a hundred Köchel numbers later, are essayed fully in the operas. Whether or not one chooses to regard these pieces from such a vantage point, it is true that, perhaps because the stakes are not quite as high as they are in the Olympian, large-scale works, and because Mozart was such a fine clavier-player himself, we sense with these pieces more than any others the touch of the craftsman’s hand itself. That is their special place: not central to the Mozart miracle, but revealing of it in a special way. How could they be other than a performer’s delight?

Towards a narrative

Viewed as a body of work, the Mozart piano sonatas present a particularly neat picture. A chronological survey is rewarding, since the sonatas represent all the major stylistic and emotional changes in Mozart’s mature career. And the earliest of them date from his twentieth year, by which time their composer had already gained tight control of his materials. From the outset each of the sonatas has a clearly defined identity – as always with Mozart the impression being that the choice of key is indeed key. The writing is concentrated, never wasteful, with plenty of contrast in register and texture, the approach to the keyboard is virtuosic but not at the cost of ‘expression’, and all the significant cadential and thematic junctures in the music are apparently effortlessly in relief.

Those that precede Mozart’s handwritten catalogue of his own works (i.e. up to the B-flat sonata K. 333) fall naturally into three distinct groups, markedly different in character from each other whilst boasting an impressive internal variety: The relatively late appearance of solo sonatas in Mozart’s oeuvre (K. 279-284, Munich, 1775) is significant both in that they denote a departure from his numerous early works for keyboard with violin accompaniment, and that, for the first time, he sets down on paper a type of work which previously, one presumes, he had only improvised.

Mozart often performed these pieces on his tours, and no doubt played some of them on harpsichords too. The frequency of archaic f and p contrasts can perhaps be read as testimony that Mozart had yet to come to terms with emerging possibilities of shading on new keyboard instruments of the day. In Deutsche Chronik of 27 April 1775 the then-celebrated Captain Beecke’s playing receives praise over Mozart’s for its “agility, grace … sweetness”. By 1777 however, Mozart’s mother could report from Mannheim that her son’s playing was regarded as superior in “beauty of tone, quality and execution” even though Beecke had been playing there too.

The first six sonatas, one in C, three in flat keys, and two in sharps ones, immediately illustrate Mozart’s brilliant powers of free-association. Quick successions of seemingly independent, sometimes incongruous, ideas are skilfully connected, elided, balanced to leave the impression of cohesive argument. The two tendencies – the one to enjoy each new event in its own right, the other to give each element its due proportion in relation to the whole – with their simultaneous tow, seem less like opposing imperatives in later works, especially those from Mozart’s Viennese period. Perhaps because there the delicate ambiguities of voice-leading and phrasing, of rhythmic and harmonic polarity, become so dense as to form a web complete in itself. But, in the works from the Salzburg years the experience is still decidedly of unity-in-spite-of-variety.

The last sonata in this set, composed for the Baron von Dürnitz and sometimes bearing his name in programmes, is remarkably sonorous and its finale is one of Mozart’s richest variation sets – it is also the longest movement in all the sonatas. This work (the only Mozart sonata Glenn Gould seems to have approved of wholly) stands apart from its five companions; its grandeur appears to look forward to a different manner – and indeed, throughout the next three sonatas (K. 309 and 311, Mannheim, 1777 and K. 310, Paris, 1778) it is clear that Mozart was experimenting with new keyboard sounds. The urbane, extroverted nature of the Mannheim works reflects contact with that city’s famously impressive orchestra; Leopold Mozart mentions the “rather artificial Mannheim style” in connection with K. 309.

The sense of expansion in scale is continued in the A minor sonata, K. 310, but here the richness and sheer effectiveness of sonority are subjected with complete success to the traumatic emotional content of the work. In fact, the sonata represents the kind of leap of the imagination that can only be partly explained through understanding of the professional influences and personal experiences that accompanied its conception – it simply is without precedent.  Maynard Solomon writes beautifully how its Andante cantabile con espressione, which describes the profound disturbance of an idyllic state before it is ecstatically recaptured, becomes the archetype for many of Mozart’s greatest slow movements. Its astonishing Presto finale strikes a fatalistic tone, stark forte chords bleakly arresting its breathless dance in the last bars.

All the subsequent sonatas date from Mozart’s Viennese period (roughly the last decade of his life). The first four of these (K. 330-3, 1783) significantly do not open with overt gestural pronouncements as in the preceding four sonatas, but with ingenuous lyrical ideas, emblematic in a larger sense of the harmoniousness and fluency that pervade throughout. It may be said that by now Mozart maintains the generous, humane buffo perspective that is the hallmark of his mature language. The brittleness of some of the keyboard writing in the earlier sonatas is largely absent. Each of these sonatas has its particular, carefully modulated tonal hue, its own balancing of the thoughtful, the affecting and the playful. The F major sonata, K. 332, for instance, boasts a spectacular digital pianistic display across the entire range of the keyboard in its finale to balance the very specific orchestral sonorities and vocal style that are conjured in the opening and second movements respectively. The Rondo alla Turca which concludes the A major sonata, K. 331 is both a clever coup and the natural fruition of the ‘exotic’ tendencies of the preceding movements.

Citing the C minor sonata (K. 457, 1784) as a work which foreshadows Beethoven’s ‘C minor mood’ is a popular critical misconception: the raw energy and wilfulness that drive Beethoven’s allegros are largely absent. In fact, the more vital forte sections scattered through the fast movements here act as a kind of frame to uphold a work beset by a sinking sense of doubt. Most typical are the nervous changes of mood and the frequent, enigmatic, often disconcerting, caesuras. The Fantasy (K. 475, 1785) was subsequently composed as an elaborate prelude to this sonata. Mozart here indulges in some of the wayward timbral contrasts and harmonic, and enharmonic, manoeuvres of the Sturm und Drang keyboard tradition; at times the heavy brushstrokes and ceremonial gravity are even reminiscent of his minor key church music. It is evidently a carefully constructed piece, with one of Mozart’s most beautifully paced endings, the title referring to the stylistic quirks of a genre rather than to haphazard improvisation.

It was presumably Mozart’s haste in preparing a sonata for his new employer, Joseph II that prompted his use of an earlier rondo (K. 494, 1786) as finale to a newly composed Allegro and Andante (K. 533, 1788). The first movement is one of Mozart’s virtuosic essays in combining the ‘grammar’ of a sonata allegro with contrapuntal and pseudo-contrapuntal techniques, enabling all sorts of rhetorical games. Here the very effortlessness of the dance between the two hands attains the quality of profundity. The slow movement is perhaps the most complex in the sonatas in its changes of moods, its harsh sayings eventually resolved in a state of rapture. The choice of the fairly straightforward rondo is often labelled disappointing after the ripeness and depth of the other two movements. Or one might view it as a master-stroke: a clearing of the palate after some strong contrapuntal and harmonic flavour. Seen in that light, the cadenza-like passage-work and the dramatic sweep of stretti on the penultimate page (both insertions from 1788), the wind serenade-like episode in F minor, and the dark colouring in the bass-register at the conclusion of the piece, are just enough to put into question the apparent innocuousness of the rondo-theme.

In the last three sonatas (K. 545, 1788; K. 570 and K. 576, 1789) the vivid extremes of K. 533 are rare. Although Mozart composed them in his early thirties they can be described as ‘late’ in that they are the product of a creativity that has already reached fullest expression and that they are written from a perspective that is in a sense beyond achievement; that is, beyond the need to ‘prove’ anything. Mozart’s later works do not set out to critique his own earlier achievements, turn away from them in radically new directions, or turn inward unconcerned with his audience – for that he died just too early – but a late quality they very clearly exemplify is that they often seem to take economy of writing to an extreme. Here are no ostentatious displays; rather these works unfold within very carefully maintained spectra of possibility, demonstrating an absolutely precise knowledge of what is essential and what is not.

The slow movement of K. 545, for instance, could not possibly but be the work of a past master, showing how apparently the simplest means can be handled to their most acute expressive effect.

These last three sonatas belong to a group of Mozart’s instrumental works to which Hermann Hesse’s description of the “cheerfulness” of Classical music perhaps applies best. This cheerfulness, characterised by order and lucidity, is “aware of the tragedy of the human condition” but finds higher joy in a purer kind of beauty. Spectacular effects of light and darkness are replaced by more subtle shifts in mood: in the faster movements rich sonorities are generally eschewed in favour of two-part writing which borders (in sometimes very witty ways) on the sketchy; the slow movements now have a retrospective quality – of remembered rather than immediate experience – of experience reflected on, and clarification gained. So, when Mozart died young, with many circumstances in his professional and personal life unresolved, his artistic career had in a sense come full circle – or so it seems to us, since these later instrumental works speak anew with a childlike freshness, directness, and also vulnerability.

Sep
24
Tue
ANTIEK- & VERSAMELAARSMARK @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 24 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Die Voortrekkermonument se Antiek- en Versamelaarsmark

Voornemende uitstallers kan Geraldine op 012 326-6770 skakel. Die mark vind op die dak van die Groot Amfiteater plaas. Dit begin om 09:00 en eindig om 15:00. Uitstallers word gekeur en stalletjies word permanent aan hulle toegeken.

Vir navrae of om ‘n stalletjie te bespreek, kontak Geraldine Paulsen by (tel) (012) 326-6770 of bemarking@vtm.org.za.

Kantoorure – Maandag tot Vrydag van 08:00 tot 16:00.

Braaidag by die Voortrekkermonument @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 24 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
MOZART COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS – HIROAKI TAKENOUCHI – CONCERT 2 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 24 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Hiroaki Takenouchi performs the
complete cycle of the Mozart Piano Sonatas.
5 concerts in collaboration with the Embassy of Japan in South Africa.

Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00; Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 & Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00
Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00; Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00

To experience live performances, featuring the entire set of 18 piano sonatas by Mozart, is extremely rare in international terms.Brooklyn Theatre is very proud to host this project with the world famous Japanese pianist, Hiroaki Takenouchi. This will be the first project of its kind in South African music history. Takenouchi has added an additional work to 3 of the performances to balance the recitals time-wise. These are: The Fantasy in C minor K.475, Rondo in A minor K.511 and the Adagio in B minor K. 540.

Takenouchi’s visit is a veritable feast of Mozart’s music, as he will also be performing two Mozart piano concertos with the GPO.

Concert 1 – Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Sonata No.1 in C K.279
Fantasy in C minor K.475
Sonata No.14 in C minor K.457
Sonata No.12 in F K.332
Sonata No.9 in D K.311

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Concert 2 – Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 – Book now

Sonata No.2 in F K.280
Sonata No.7 in C K.309
Sonata No.5 in G K.283
Sonata No.8 in A minor K.310

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Concert 3 – Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00 – Book now

Sonata No.3 in B flat K.281
Sonata No.10 in C K.330
Rondo in A minor K.511
Sonata No.11 in A K.331

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Concert 4 – Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00 – Book now

Sonata No.4 in E flat K.282
Sonata No.15 in F K.533/494
Sonata No.16 in C K.545
Sonata No.13 in B flat K.333

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Concert 5 – Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Adagio in B minor K.540
Sonata No.6 in D K.284
Sonata No.17 in B flat K.570
Sonata No.18 in D K.576

Ticket prices

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R160
Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R110

Brooklyn Theatre
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park
012-460-6033

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

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MOZART’S PIANO SONATAS

Daniel-Ben Pienaar

Enthusiastically championed by artists like Lily Krauss, derided by others, most notoriously Glenn Gould, Mozart’s piano sonatas occupy a special position in his output. Unlike Beethoven’s sonatas, these works are not central to their composer’s achievement. Nevertheless, they are unique as a polished body of works for a single instrument: and this is especially significant in Mozart’s case.

His contributions in all major genres are celebrated. In the great operatic comedies and the Singspiels he revels in the very artificiality of the stage to create real emotional states in his characters, and to portray true relationships. In the great concertos his piano soloist becomes an incandescent Everyman in the ‘social’ context of the individual wind instruments and the collective body of strings – quite unlike its often heroic, combative role in later concertos. In the late symphonies he finds an epic voice unimagined before in orchestral music, infusing exchanges of material and contrasts of mood with an apparently celebratory logic – a logic the essence of which remains elusive upon examination. The mature quintets and quartets, impassioned in unified sonority and expressive intent, are also exquisitely, graphically contrapuntal in the kaleidoscopic complexity of responses and reactions between and amongst the instruments. Throughout the large body of violin-and-piano sonatas a rapt dialogue between the I and the Other unfolds.

So, Mozart’s acute sensitivity to different instrumental and vocal timbres and his virtuosity at juxtaposing and reconciling the most unlikely materials in an apparently effortless and natural way, place him supreme as creator of characters – whether that be in his operas, or when he personifies instruments themselves. That is central to virtually all his greatest achievements. And it is obvious to even the naïve listener that dialogic interaction is crucial to the ebb and flow of the music – never more so than in the dramas, games and discourse of sonata.

Such dialogue can be heard in these piano sonatas too, but since Mozart cannot here characterise the instrument itself in the context of other instruments, he makes use of contrasts in dynamics, registers and textures to enable reference to other instrumental and vocal forces, and genres, enabling make-believe exchanges. By contrast, in the piano concertos, however varied the role of the piano may be, the soloist in that context has a unified identity, inevitably rendering the piano sonority more homogenous than should be the experience when listening to the works for piano alone.

Here, then, we find concentrations of symphonic material, or concerto tutti/solo duality and virtuoso passage work, or tender wind serenade exchanges, ardent string quartets: but we do so through musical simile. Simile rather than metaphor, since the paradox is that all this is cast in an eminently ‘pianistic’ idiom in a way which would resist effective transcription. Of course complex cross-reference like this abounds in Mozart’s language in general, but what is special about these works is that a single player has to vivify the implied exchanges between ‘instruments’ and ‘characters’ – and all in an unquestionably domestic or, at least intimate, setting. These works may at times refer to public styles of holding forth, or have large-scale implications by virtue of depth of content, but in their original instrumentation they demand quiet listening.

This leads to some difficult questions for those who wish to play the Mozart sonatas on a modern concert grand. Its identity as the vehicle of the recital and concerto virtuoso, its scale of sound and the way in which that sound is produced mean that every aspect of playing these works has to be re-imagined and re-invented. On the one hand, the pianist may have in mind the fortepiano in its private or concert setting, on the other the chamber, orchestral or vocal forces that are referred to. Thus he has the option to adopt an intimate voice – or not; but given the many contradictory qualities and capabilities of the modern piano, no obligation either way. It is so that even with the best translation much is lost, but if the translator is himself more than an artisan something new will be gained too. The performer might even want to approach these works with a completely anachronistic attitude, irrespective of what he knows about their intended instrumentation and frame of reference.

Moreover it is inescapable that the ways in which the concert grand speaks and sings and dances – its arts of voicing, pedalling, accentuation, touch, cantabile fully and shrewdly manipulated – were perfected through the nineteenth century: i.e. it is inescapable that a performance practice for these works that engages the instrument’s full expressive potential needs to look beyond easy categories of ‘authentic’, or ‘modern’ or ‘historically-informed’. One might say that, when a pianist immerses himself in this music, ‘interpretation’ is only one of many tools that he takes in hand, but by no means an accurate description of what he may fashion in the end.

These highly finished works, terse in utterance, even the more extensive amongst them generally only around twenty minutes in length, yet very rich in activity, rich in personality and topoi have, particularly in their fast movements, a nervous energy and intensity that is rarely heard in piano performances.

Friedrich Gulda’s recordings of ten sonatas are a notable exception; the Lily Krauss renditions are more cultured and varied but restless too in their quest for ever more nuances and surprises. But – this kind of wonderful unpredictability has generally not been evident in performances of these works. The development of the modern piano through the nineteenth century and, one has to concede, the impressive legacy of Beethoven’s sonatas with their robust treatment of the instrument, largely relegated Mozart’s solo piano works to the realm of pedagogy.

These days they are still used as a training ground for decoding, and learning reflex responses to the standard figurations of Viennese Classical music. It is not surprising that such treatment has engendered a ‘binary’ attitude to articulation and pulse in modern piano performances which rarely move beyond received notions. On sonorous concert instruments the relatively sparse textures of these works are treated with blanket restraint (presumably as an illustration that the performer is in command of the ‘style’), without the built-in tensions that render restraint powerful – producing precious, saccharine sonorities that project the music as no more than ‘antique’ art objects. Futhermore, the facile stereotype of Mozart as the epitome of elegance provides temptation for the pianist to perform the supposed seductive beauty of the music rather than its supposed character or feeling.

Two aspects of the scores are of special interest to pianists: ‘articulation’ marks, and dynamics markings. One of the pedagogical mores that also render the performance of these works didactic is an unimaginative, somewhat literalist approach to the slurs (‘bowings’) and different kinds of staccato marks that are found with unpredictable frequency on each page. The truth is that Mozart is anything but consistent with these markings – even to the extent that in some cases his quotation of the opening phrase of a work in his Thematic Catologue differs in these details from the autograph score. In any case, the way the modern instrument ‘speaks’ is so radically different from Mozart’s instruments that it is unthinkable that adherence to even a standardised style of articulation should ever take priority over the great varieties of touch and stress available to the pianist. Following from this it becomes imperative too to consider the implications for accentuation and emphasis of a fluent piano technique – kinetically very different from a fluent fortepiano technique.

Regarding dynamics one quickly observes that, in the first nine sonatas especially, Mozart somewhat obsessively marks, for the most part, f and p. Perhaps this is still, relatively early on in his career, a legacy of the less dynamically sensitive instruments he grew up with. Again, a literalist, binary reading can leave a somewhat blunt, unresponsive impression. However, the placement of these dynamics is extremely telling in that they very often imply phrasings and groupings that the notes on their own do not: more evidence of Mozart’s restless, ludic musical mind – relishing all types of assymetry – assymetry that seeks at least the illusion of clarification and balancing, thus propelling the music forward. A far cry from suavity on the one hand or prettiness on the other.

The piano sonatas fascinatingly oscillate between the domestic and the public, not only in their references, but – being by nature playful and thoughtful – also moving between that which includes the audience and that which does not. Vital is the image of the improviser/composer; so too the kind of open experimentation which is a result of abundant facility and an abundance of creativity.

Gulda provocatively posits that in the piano sonatas one finds ideas which, more or less a hundred Köchel numbers later, are essayed fully in the operas. Whether or not one chooses to regard these pieces from such a vantage point, it is true that, perhaps because the stakes are not quite as high as they are in the Olympian, large-scale works, and because Mozart was such a fine clavier-player himself, we sense with these pieces more than any others the touch of the craftsman’s hand itself. That is their special place: not central to the Mozart miracle, but revealing of it in a special way. How could they be other than a performer’s delight?

Towards a narrative

Viewed as a body of work, the Mozart piano sonatas present a particularly neat picture. A chronological survey is rewarding, since the sonatas represent all the major stylistic and emotional changes in Mozart’s mature career. And the earliest of them date from his twentieth year, by which time their composer had already gained tight control of his materials. From the outset each of the sonatas has a clearly defined identity – as always with Mozart the impression being that the choice of key is indeed key. The writing is concentrated, never wasteful, with plenty of contrast in register and texture, the approach to the keyboard is virtuosic but not at the cost of ‘expression’, and all the significant cadential and thematic junctures in the music are apparently effortlessly in relief.

Those that precede Mozart’s handwritten catalogue of his own works (i.e. up to the B-flat sonata K. 333) fall naturally into three distinct groups, markedly different in character from each other whilst boasting an impressive internal variety: The relatively late appearance of solo sonatas in Mozart’s oeuvre (K. 279-284, Munich, 1775) is significant both in that they denote a departure from his numerous early works for keyboard with violin accompaniment, and that, for the first time, he sets down on paper a type of work which previously, one presumes, he had only improvised.

Mozart often performed these pieces on his tours, and no doubt played some of them on harpsichords too. The frequency of archaic f and p contrasts can perhaps be read as testimony that Mozart had yet to come to terms with emerging possibilities of shading on new keyboard instruments of the day. In Deutsche Chronik of 27 April 1775 the then-celebrated Captain Beecke’s playing receives praise over Mozart’s for its “agility, grace … sweetness”. By 1777 however, Mozart’s mother could report from Mannheim that her son’s playing was regarded as superior in “beauty of tone, quality and execution” even though Beecke had been playing there too.

The first six sonatas, one in C, three in flat keys, and two in sharps ones, immediately illustrate Mozart’s brilliant powers of free-association. Quick successions of seemingly independent, sometimes incongruous, ideas are skilfully connected, elided, balanced to leave the impression of cohesive argument. The two tendencies – the one to enjoy each new event in its own right, the other to give each element its due proportion in relation to the whole – with their simultaneous tow, seem less like opposing imperatives in later works, especially those from Mozart’s Viennese period. Perhaps because there the delicate ambiguities of voice-leading and phrasing, of rhythmic and harmonic polarity, become so dense as to form a web complete in itself. But, in the works from the Salzburg years the experience is still decidedly of unity-in-spite-of-variety.

The last sonata in this set, composed for the Baron von Dürnitz and sometimes bearing his name in programmes, is remarkably sonorous and its finale is one of Mozart’s richest variation sets – it is also the longest movement in all the sonatas. This work (the only Mozart sonata Glenn Gould seems to have approved of wholly) stands apart from its five companions; its grandeur appears to look forward to a different manner – and indeed, throughout the next three sonatas (K. 309 and 311, Mannheim, 1777 and K. 310, Paris, 1778) it is clear that Mozart was experimenting with new keyboard sounds. The urbane, extroverted nature of the Mannheim works reflects contact with that city’s famously impressive orchestra; Leopold Mozart mentions the “rather artificial Mannheim style” in connection with K. 309.

The sense of expansion in scale is continued in the A minor sonata, K. 310, but here the richness and sheer effectiveness of sonority are subjected with complete success to the traumatic emotional content of the work. In fact, the sonata represents the kind of leap of the imagination that can only be partly explained through understanding of the professional influences and personal experiences that accompanied its conception – it simply is without precedent.  Maynard Solomon writes beautifully how its Andante cantabile con espressione, which describes the profound disturbance of an idyllic state before it is ecstatically recaptured, becomes the archetype for many of Mozart’s greatest slow movements. Its astonishing Presto finale strikes a fatalistic tone, stark forte chords bleakly arresting its breathless dance in the last bars.

All the subsequent sonatas date from Mozart’s Viennese period (roughly the last decade of his life). The first four of these (K. 330-3, 1783) significantly do not open with overt gestural pronouncements as in the preceding four sonatas, but with ingenuous lyrical ideas, emblematic in a larger sense of the harmoniousness and fluency that pervade throughout. It may be said that by now Mozart maintains the generous, humane buffo perspective that is the hallmark of his mature language. The brittleness of some of the keyboard writing in the earlier sonatas is largely absent. Each of these sonatas has its particular, carefully modulated tonal hue, its own balancing of the thoughtful, the affecting and the playful. The F major sonata, K. 332, for instance, boasts a spectacular digital pianistic display across the entire range of the keyboard in its finale to balance the very specific orchestral sonorities and vocal style that are conjured in the opening and second movements respectively. The Rondo alla Turca which concludes the A major sonata, K. 331 is both a clever coup and the natural fruition of the ‘exotic’ tendencies of the preceding movements.

Citing the C minor sonata (K. 457, 1784) as a work which foreshadows Beethoven’s ‘C minor mood’ is a popular critical misconception: the raw energy and wilfulness that drive Beethoven’s allegros are largely absent. In fact, the more vital forte sections scattered through the fast movements here act as a kind of frame to uphold a work beset by a sinking sense of doubt. Most typical are the nervous changes of mood and the frequent, enigmatic, often disconcerting, caesuras. The Fantasy (K. 475, 1785) was subsequently composed as an elaborate prelude to this sonata. Mozart here indulges in some of the wayward timbral contrasts and harmonic, and enharmonic, manoeuvres of the Sturm und Drang keyboard tradition; at times the heavy brushstrokes and ceremonial gravity are even reminiscent of his minor key church music. It is evidently a carefully constructed piece, with one of Mozart’s most beautifully paced endings, the title referring to the stylistic quirks of a genre rather than to haphazard improvisation.

It was presumably Mozart’s haste in preparing a sonata for his new employer, Joseph II that prompted his use of an earlier rondo (K. 494, 1786) as finale to a newly composed Allegro and Andante (K. 533, 1788). The first movement is one of Mozart’s virtuosic essays in combining the ‘grammar’ of a sonata allegro with contrapuntal and pseudo-contrapuntal techniques, enabling all sorts of rhetorical games. Here the very effortlessness of the dance between the two hands attains the quality of profundity. The slow movement is perhaps the most complex in the sonatas in its changes of moods, its harsh sayings eventually resolved in a state of rapture. The choice of the fairly straightforward rondo is often labelled disappointing after the ripeness and depth of the other two movements. Or one might view it as a master-stroke: a clearing of the palate after some strong contrapuntal and harmonic flavour. Seen in that light, the cadenza-like passage-work and the dramatic sweep of stretti on the penultimate page (both insertions from 1788), the wind serenade-like episode in F minor, and the dark colouring in the bass-register at the conclusion of the piece, are just enough to put into question the apparent innocuousness of the rondo-theme.

In the last three sonatas (K. 545, 1788; K. 570 and K. 576, 1789) the vivid extremes of K. 533 are rare. Although Mozart composed them in his early thirties they can be described as ‘late’ in that they are the product of a creativity that has already reached fullest expression and that they are written from a perspective that is in a sense beyond achievement; that is, beyond the need to ‘prove’ anything. Mozart’s later works do not set out to critique his own earlier achievements, turn away from them in radically new directions, or turn inward unconcerned with his audience – for that he died just too early – but a late quality they very clearly exemplify is that they often seem to take economy of writing to an extreme. Here are no ostentatious displays; rather these works unfold within very carefully maintained spectra of possibility, demonstrating an absolutely precise knowledge of what is essential and what is not.

The slow movement of K. 545, for instance, could not possibly but be the work of a past master, showing how apparently the simplest means can be handled to their most acute expressive effect.

These last three sonatas belong to a group of Mozart’s instrumental works to which Hermann Hesse’s description of the “cheerfulness” of Classical music perhaps applies best. This cheerfulness, characterised by order and lucidity, is “aware of the tragedy of the human condition” but finds higher joy in a purer kind of beauty. Spectacular effects of light and darkness are replaced by more subtle shifts in mood: in the faster movements rich sonorities are generally eschewed in favour of two-part writing which borders (in sometimes very witty ways) on the sketchy; the slow movements now have a retrospective quality – of remembered rather than immediate experience – of experience reflected on, and clarification gained. So, when Mozart died young, with many circumstances in his professional and personal life unresolved, his artistic career had in a sense come full circle – or so it seems to us, since these later instrumental works speak anew with a childlike freshness, directness, and also vulnerability.

MOZART COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS – HIROAKI TAKENOUCHI – CONCERT 3 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 24 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Hiroaki Takenouchi performs the
complete cycle of the Mozart Piano Sonatas.
5 concerts in collaboration with the Embassy of Japan in South Africa.

Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00; Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 & Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00
Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00; Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00

To experience live performances, featuring the entire set of 18 piano sonatas by Mozart, is extremely rare in international terms.Brooklyn Theatre is very proud to host this project with the world famous Japanese pianist, Hiroaki Takenouchi. This will be the first project of its kind in South African music history. Takenouchi has added an additional work to 3 of the performances to balance the recitals time-wise. These are: The Fantasy in C minor K.475, Rondo in A minor K.511 and the Adagio in B minor K. 540.

Takenouchi’s visit is a veritable feast of Mozart’s music, as he will also be performing two Mozart piano concertos with the GPO.

Concert 1 – Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Sonata No.1 in C K.279
Fantasy in C minor K.475
Sonata No.14 in C minor K.457
Sonata No.12 in F K.332
Sonata No.9 in D K.311

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Concert 2 – Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 – Book now

Sonata No.2 in F K.280
Sonata No.7 in C K.309
Sonata No.5 in G K.283
Sonata No.8 in A minor K.310

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Concert 3 – Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00 – Book now

Sonata No.3 in B flat K.281
Sonata No.10 in C K.330
Rondo in A minor K.511
Sonata No.11 in A K.331

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Concert 4 – Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00 – Book now

Sonata No.4 in E flat K.282
Sonata No.15 in F K.533/494
Sonata No.16 in C K.545
Sonata No.13 in B flat K.333

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Concert 5 – Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Adagio in B minor K.540
Sonata No.6 in D K.284
Sonata No.17 in B flat K.570
Sonata No.18 in D K.576

Ticket prices

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R160
Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R110

Brooklyn Theatre
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park
012-460-6033

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

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MOZART’S PIANO SONATAS

Daniel-Ben Pienaar

Enthusiastically championed by artists like Lily Krauss, derided by others, most notoriously Glenn Gould, Mozart’s piano sonatas occupy a special position in his output. Unlike Beethoven’s sonatas, these works are not central to their composer’s achievement. Nevertheless, they are unique as a polished body of works for a single instrument: and this is especially significant in Mozart’s case.

His contributions in all major genres are celebrated. In the great operatic comedies and the Singspiels he revels in the very artificiality of the stage to create real emotional states in his characters, and to portray true relationships. In the great concertos his piano soloist becomes an incandescent Everyman in the ‘social’ context of the individual wind instruments and the collective body of strings – quite unlike its often heroic, combative role in later concertos. In the late symphonies he finds an epic voice unimagined before in orchestral music, infusing exchanges of material and contrasts of mood with an apparently celebratory logic – a logic the essence of which remains elusive upon examination. The mature quintets and quartets, impassioned in unified sonority and expressive intent, are also exquisitely, graphically contrapuntal in the kaleidoscopic complexity of responses and reactions between and amongst the instruments. Throughout the large body of violin-and-piano sonatas a rapt dialogue between the I and the Other unfolds.

So, Mozart’s acute sensitivity to different instrumental and vocal timbres and his virtuosity at juxtaposing and reconciling the most unlikely materials in an apparently effortless and natural way, place him supreme as creator of characters – whether that be in his operas, or when he personifies instruments themselves. That is central to virtually all his greatest achievements. And it is obvious to even the naïve listener that dialogic interaction is crucial to the ebb and flow of the music – never more so than in the dramas, games and discourse of sonata.

Such dialogue can be heard in these piano sonatas too, but since Mozart cannot here characterise the instrument itself in the context of other instruments, he makes use of contrasts in dynamics, registers and textures to enable reference to other instrumental and vocal forces, and genres, enabling make-believe exchanges. By contrast, in the piano concertos, however varied the role of the piano may be, the soloist in that context has a unified identity, inevitably rendering the piano sonority more homogenous than should be the experience when listening to the works for piano alone.

Here, then, we find concentrations of symphonic material, or concerto tutti/solo duality and virtuoso passage work, or tender wind serenade exchanges, ardent string quartets: but we do so through musical simile. Simile rather than metaphor, since the paradox is that all this is cast in an eminently ‘pianistic’ idiom in a way which would resist effective transcription. Of course complex cross-reference like this abounds in Mozart’s language in general, but what is special about these works is that a single player has to vivify the implied exchanges between ‘instruments’ and ‘characters’ – and all in an unquestionably domestic or, at least intimate, setting. These works may at times refer to public styles of holding forth, or have large-scale implications by virtue of depth of content, but in their original instrumentation they demand quiet listening.

This leads to some difficult questions for those who wish to play the Mozart sonatas on a modern concert grand. Its identity as the vehicle of the recital and concerto virtuoso, its scale of sound and the way in which that sound is produced mean that every aspect of playing these works has to be re-imagined and re-invented. On the one hand, the pianist may have in mind the fortepiano in its private or concert setting, on the other the chamber, orchestral or vocal forces that are referred to. Thus he has the option to adopt an intimate voice – or not; but given the many contradictory qualities and capabilities of the modern piano, no obligation either way. It is so that even with the best translation much is lost, but if the translator is himself more than an artisan something new will be gained too. The performer might even want to approach these works with a completely anachronistic attitude, irrespective of what he knows about their intended instrumentation and frame of reference.

Moreover it is inescapable that the ways in which the concert grand speaks and sings and dances – its arts of voicing, pedalling, accentuation, touch, cantabile fully and shrewdly manipulated – were perfected through the nineteenth century: i.e. it is inescapable that a performance practice for these works that engages the instrument’s full expressive potential needs to look beyond easy categories of ‘authentic’, or ‘modern’ or ‘historically-informed’. One might say that, when a pianist immerses himself in this music, ‘interpretation’ is only one of many tools that he takes in hand, but by no means an accurate description of what he may fashion in the end.

These highly finished works, terse in utterance, even the more extensive amongst them generally only around twenty minutes in length, yet very rich in activity, rich in personality and topoi have, particularly in their fast movements, a nervous energy and intensity that is rarely heard in piano performances.

Friedrich Gulda’s recordings of ten sonatas are a notable exception; the Lily Krauss renditions are more cultured and varied but restless too in their quest for ever more nuances and surprises. But – this kind of wonderful unpredictability has generally not been evident in performances of these works. The development of the modern piano through the nineteenth century and, one has to concede, the impressive legacy of Beethoven’s sonatas with their robust treatment of the instrument, largely relegated Mozart’s solo piano works to the realm of pedagogy.

These days they are still used as a training ground for decoding, and learning reflex responses to the standard figurations of Viennese Classical music. It is not surprising that such treatment has engendered a ‘binary’ attitude to articulation and pulse in modern piano performances which rarely move beyond received notions. On sonorous concert instruments the relatively sparse textures of these works are treated with blanket restraint (presumably as an illustration that the performer is in command of the ‘style’), without the built-in tensions that render restraint powerful – producing precious, saccharine sonorities that project the music as no more than ‘antique’ art objects. Futhermore, the facile stereotype of Mozart as the epitome of elegance provides temptation for the pianist to perform the supposed seductive beauty of the music rather than its supposed character or feeling.

Two aspects of the scores are of special interest to pianists: ‘articulation’ marks, and dynamics markings. One of the pedagogical mores that also render the performance of these works didactic is an unimaginative, somewhat literalist approach to the slurs (‘bowings’) and different kinds of staccato marks that are found with unpredictable frequency on each page. The truth is that Mozart is anything but consistent with these markings – even to the extent that in some cases his quotation of the opening phrase of a work in his Thematic Catologue differs in these details from the autograph score. In any case, the way the modern instrument ‘speaks’ is so radically different from Mozart’s instruments that it is unthinkable that adherence to even a standardised style of articulation should ever take priority over the great varieties of touch and stress available to the pianist. Following from this it becomes imperative too to consider the implications for accentuation and emphasis of a fluent piano technique – kinetically very different from a fluent fortepiano technique.

Regarding dynamics one quickly observes that, in the first nine sonatas especially, Mozart somewhat obsessively marks, for the most part, f and p. Perhaps this is still, relatively early on in his career, a legacy of the less dynamically sensitive instruments he grew up with. Again, a literalist, binary reading can leave a somewhat blunt, unresponsive impression. However, the placement of these dynamics is extremely telling in that they very often imply phrasings and groupings that the notes on their own do not: more evidence of Mozart’s restless, ludic musical mind – relishing all types of assymetry – assymetry that seeks at least the illusion of clarification and balancing, thus propelling the music forward. A far cry from suavity on the one hand or prettiness on the other.

The piano sonatas fascinatingly oscillate between the domestic and the public, not only in their references, but – being by nature playful and thoughtful – also moving between that which includes the audience and that which does not. Vital is the image of the improviser/composer; so too the kind of open experimentation which is a result of abundant facility and an abundance of creativity.

Gulda provocatively posits that in the piano sonatas one finds ideas which, more or less a hundred Köchel numbers later, are essayed fully in the operas. Whether or not one chooses to regard these pieces from such a vantage point, it is true that, perhaps because the stakes are not quite as high as they are in the Olympian, large-scale works, and because Mozart was such a fine clavier-player himself, we sense with these pieces more than any others the touch of the craftsman’s hand itself. That is their special place: not central to the Mozart miracle, but revealing of it in a special way. How could they be other than a performer’s delight?

Towards a narrative

Viewed as a body of work, the Mozart piano sonatas present a particularly neat picture. A chronological survey is rewarding, since the sonatas represent all the major stylistic and emotional changes in Mozart’s mature career. And the earliest of them date from his twentieth year, by which time their composer had already gained tight control of his materials. From the outset each of the sonatas has a clearly defined identity – as always with Mozart the impression being that the choice of key is indeed key. The writing is concentrated, never wasteful, with plenty of contrast in register and texture, the approach to the keyboard is virtuosic but not at the cost of ‘expression’, and all the significant cadential and thematic junctures in the music are apparently effortlessly in relief.

Those that precede Mozart’s handwritten catalogue of his own works (i.e. up to the B-flat sonata K. 333) fall naturally into three distinct groups, markedly different in character from each other whilst boasting an impressive internal variety: The relatively late appearance of solo sonatas in Mozart’s oeuvre (K. 279-284, Munich, 1775) is significant both in that they denote a departure from his numerous early works for keyboard with violin accompaniment, and that, for the first time, he sets down on paper a type of work which previously, one presumes, he had only improvised.

Mozart often performed these pieces on his tours, and no doubt played some of them on harpsichords too. The frequency of archaic f and p contrasts can perhaps be read as testimony that Mozart had yet to come to terms with emerging possibilities of shading on new keyboard instruments of the day. In Deutsche Chronik of 27 April 1775 the then-celebrated Captain Beecke’s playing receives praise over Mozart’s for its “agility, grace … sweetness”. By 1777 however, Mozart’s mother could report from Mannheim that her son’s playing was regarded as superior in “beauty of tone, quality and execution” even though Beecke had been playing there too.

The first six sonatas, one in C, three in flat keys, and two in sharps ones, immediately illustrate Mozart’s brilliant powers of free-association. Quick successions of seemingly independent, sometimes incongruous, ideas are skilfully connected, elided, balanced to leave the impression of cohesive argument. The two tendencies – the one to enjoy each new event in its own right, the other to give each element its due proportion in relation to the whole – with their simultaneous tow, seem less like opposing imperatives in later works, especially those from Mozart’s Viennese period. Perhaps because there the delicate ambiguities of voice-leading and phrasing, of rhythmic and harmonic polarity, become so dense as to form a web complete in itself. But, in the works from the Salzburg years the experience is still decidedly of unity-in-spite-of-variety.

The last sonata in this set, composed for the Baron von Dürnitz and sometimes bearing his name in programmes, is remarkably sonorous and its finale is one of Mozart’s richest variation sets – it is also the longest movement in all the sonatas. This work (the only Mozart sonata Glenn Gould seems to have approved of wholly) stands apart from its five companions; its grandeur appears to look forward to a different manner – and indeed, throughout the next three sonatas (K. 309 and 311, Mannheim, 1777 and K. 310, Paris, 1778) it is clear that Mozart was experimenting with new keyboard sounds. The urbane, extroverted nature of the Mannheim works reflects contact with that city’s famously impressive orchestra; Leopold Mozart mentions the “rather artificial Mannheim style” in connection with K. 309.

The sense of expansion in scale is continued in the A minor sonata, K. 310, but here the richness and sheer effectiveness of sonority are subjected with complete success to the traumatic emotional content of the work. In fact, the sonata represents the kind of leap of the imagination that can only be partly explained through understanding of the professional influences and personal experiences that accompanied its conception – it simply is without precedent.  Maynard Solomon writes beautifully how its Andante cantabile con espressione, which describes the profound disturbance of an idyllic state before it is ecstatically recaptured, becomes the archetype for many of Mozart’s greatest slow movements. Its astonishing Presto finale strikes a fatalistic tone, stark forte chords bleakly arresting its breathless dance in the last bars.

All the subsequent sonatas date from Mozart’s Viennese period (roughly the last decade of his life). The first four of these (K. 330-3, 1783) significantly do not open with overt gestural pronouncements as in the preceding four sonatas, but with ingenuous lyrical ideas, emblematic in a larger sense of the harmoniousness and fluency that pervade throughout. It may be said that by now Mozart maintains the generous, humane buffo perspective that is the hallmark of his mature language. The brittleness of some of the keyboard writing in the earlier sonatas is largely absent. Each of these sonatas has its particular, carefully modulated tonal hue, its own balancing of the thoughtful, the affecting and the playful. The F major sonata, K. 332, for instance, boasts a spectacular digital pianistic display across the entire range of the keyboard in its finale to balance the very specific orchestral sonorities and vocal style that are conjured in the opening and second movements respectively. The Rondo alla Turca which concludes the A major sonata, K. 331 is both a clever coup and the natural fruition of the ‘exotic’ tendencies of the preceding movements.

Citing the C minor sonata (K. 457, 1784) as a work which foreshadows Beethoven’s ‘C minor mood’ is a popular critical misconception: the raw energy and wilfulness that drive Beethoven’s allegros are largely absent. In fact, the more vital forte sections scattered through the fast movements here act as a kind of frame to uphold a work beset by a sinking sense of doubt. Most typical are the nervous changes of mood and the frequent, enigmatic, often disconcerting, caesuras. The Fantasy (K. 475, 1785) was subsequently composed as an elaborate prelude to this sonata. Mozart here indulges in some of the wayward timbral contrasts and harmonic, and enharmonic, manoeuvres of the Sturm und Drang keyboard tradition; at times the heavy brushstrokes and ceremonial gravity are even reminiscent of his minor key church music. It is evidently a carefully constructed piece, with one of Mozart’s most beautifully paced endings, the title referring to the stylistic quirks of a genre rather than to haphazard improvisation.

It was presumably Mozart’s haste in preparing a sonata for his new employer, Joseph II that prompted his use of an earlier rondo (K. 494, 1786) as finale to a newly composed Allegro and Andante (K. 533, 1788). The first movement is one of Mozart’s virtuosic essays in combining the ‘grammar’ of a sonata allegro with contrapuntal and pseudo-contrapuntal techniques, enabling all sorts of rhetorical games. Here the very effortlessness of the dance between the two hands attains the quality of profundity. The slow movement is perhaps the most complex in the sonatas in its changes of moods, its harsh sayings eventually resolved in a state of rapture. The choice of the fairly straightforward rondo is often labelled disappointing after the ripeness and depth of the other two movements. Or one might view it as a master-stroke: a clearing of the palate after some strong contrapuntal and harmonic flavour. Seen in that light, the cadenza-like passage-work and the dramatic sweep of stretti on the penultimate page (both insertions from 1788), the wind serenade-like episode in F minor, and the dark colouring in the bass-register at the conclusion of the piece, are just enough to put into question the apparent innocuousness of the rondo-theme.

In the last three sonatas (K. 545, 1788; K. 570 and K. 576, 1789) the vivid extremes of K. 533 are rare. Although Mozart composed them in his early thirties they can be described as ‘late’ in that they are the product of a creativity that has already reached fullest expression and that they are written from a perspective that is in a sense beyond achievement; that is, beyond the need to ‘prove’ anything. Mozart’s later works do not set out to critique his own earlier achievements, turn away from them in radically new directions, or turn inward unconcerned with his audience – for that he died just too early – but a late quality they very clearly exemplify is that they often seem to take economy of writing to an extreme. Here are no ostentatious displays; rather these works unfold within very carefully maintained spectra of possibility, demonstrating an absolutely precise knowledge of what is essential and what is not.

The slow movement of K. 545, for instance, could not possibly but be the work of a past master, showing how apparently the simplest means can be handled to their most acute expressive effect.

These last three sonatas belong to a group of Mozart’s instrumental works to which Hermann Hesse’s description of the “cheerfulness” of Classical music perhaps applies best. This cheerfulness, characterised by order and lucidity, is “aware of the tragedy of the human condition” but finds higher joy in a purer kind of beauty. Spectacular effects of light and darkness are replaced by more subtle shifts in mood: in the faster movements rich sonorities are generally eschewed in favour of two-part writing which borders (in sometimes very witty ways) on the sketchy; the slow movements now have a retrospective quality – of remembered rather than immediate experience – of experience reflected on, and clarification gained. So, when Mozart died young, with many circumstances in his professional and personal life unresolved, his artistic career had in a sense come full circle – or so it seems to us, since these later instrumental works speak anew with a childlike freshness, directness, and also vulnerability.

Sep
25
Wed
MOZART COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS – HIROAKI TAKENOUCHI – CONCERT 4 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 25 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Hiroaki Takenouchi performs the
complete cycle of the Mozart Piano Sonatas.
5 concerts in collaboration with the Embassy of Japan in South Africa.

Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00; Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 & Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00
Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00; Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00

To experience live performances, featuring the entire set of 18 piano sonatas by Mozart, is extremely rare in international terms.Brooklyn Theatre is very proud to host this project with the world famous Japanese pianist, Hiroaki Takenouchi. This will be the first project of its kind in South African music history. Takenouchi has added an additional work to 3 of the performances to balance the recitals time-wise. These are: The Fantasy in C minor K.475, Rondo in A minor K.511 and the Adagio in B minor K. 540.

Takenouchi’s visit is a veritable feast of Mozart’s music, as he will also be performing two Mozart piano concertos with the GPO.

Concert 1 – Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Sonata No.1 in C K.279
Fantasy in C minor K.475
Sonata No.14 in C minor K.457
Sonata No.12 in F K.332
Sonata No.9 in D K.311

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Concert 2 – Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 – Book now

Sonata No.2 in F K.280
Sonata No.7 in C K.309
Sonata No.5 in G K.283
Sonata No.8 in A minor K.310

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Concert 3 – Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00 – Book now

Sonata No.3 in B flat K.281
Sonata No.10 in C K.330
Rondo in A minor K.511
Sonata No.11 in A K.331

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Concert 4 – Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00 – Book now

Sonata No.4 in E flat K.282
Sonata No.15 in F K.533/494
Sonata No.16 in C K.545
Sonata No.13 in B flat K.333

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Concert 5 – Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Adagio in B minor K.540
Sonata No.6 in D K.284
Sonata No.17 in B flat K.570
Sonata No.18 in D K.576

Ticket prices

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R160
Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R110

Brooklyn Theatre
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park
012-460-6033

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

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MOZART’S PIANO SONATAS

Daniel-Ben Pienaar

Enthusiastically championed by artists like Lily Krauss, derided by others, most notoriously Glenn Gould, Mozart’s piano sonatas occupy a special position in his output. Unlike Beethoven’s sonatas, these works are not central to their composer’s achievement. Nevertheless, they are unique as a polished body of works for a single instrument: and this is especially significant in Mozart’s case.

His contributions in all major genres are celebrated. In the great operatic comedies and the Singspiels he revels in the very artificiality of the stage to create real emotional states in his characters, and to portray true relationships. In the great concertos his piano soloist becomes an incandescent Everyman in the ‘social’ context of the individual wind instruments and the collective body of strings – quite unlike its often heroic, combative role in later concertos. In the late symphonies he finds an epic voice unimagined before in orchestral music, infusing exchanges of material and contrasts of mood with an apparently celebratory logic – a logic the essence of which remains elusive upon examination. The mature quintets and quartets, impassioned in unified sonority and expressive intent, are also exquisitely, graphically contrapuntal in the kaleidoscopic complexity of responses and reactions between and amongst the instruments. Throughout the large body of violin-and-piano sonatas a rapt dialogue between the I and the Other unfolds.

So, Mozart’s acute sensitivity to different instrumental and vocal timbres and his virtuosity at juxtaposing and reconciling the most unlikely materials in an apparently effortless and natural way, place him supreme as creator of characters – whether that be in his operas, or when he personifies instruments themselves. That is central to virtually all his greatest achievements. And it is obvious to even the naïve listener that dialogic interaction is crucial to the ebb and flow of the music – never more so than in the dramas, games and discourse of sonata.

Such dialogue can be heard in these piano sonatas too, but since Mozart cannot here characterise the instrument itself in the context of other instruments, he makes use of contrasts in dynamics, registers and textures to enable reference to other instrumental and vocal forces, and genres, enabling make-believe exchanges. By contrast, in the piano concertos, however varied the role of the piano may be, the soloist in that context has a unified identity, inevitably rendering the piano sonority more homogenous than should be the experience when listening to the works for piano alone.

Here, then, we find concentrations of symphonic material, or concerto tutti/solo duality and virtuoso passage work, or tender wind serenade exchanges, ardent string quartets: but we do so through musical simile. Simile rather than metaphor, since the paradox is that all this is cast in an eminently ‘pianistic’ idiom in a way which would resist effective transcription. Of course complex cross-reference like this abounds in Mozart’s language in general, but what is special about these works is that a single player has to vivify the implied exchanges between ‘instruments’ and ‘characters’ – and all in an unquestionably domestic or, at least intimate, setting. These works may at times refer to public styles of holding forth, or have large-scale implications by virtue of depth of content, but in their original instrumentation they demand quiet listening.

This leads to some difficult questions for those who wish to play the Mozart sonatas on a modern concert grand. Its identity as the vehicle of the recital and concerto virtuoso, its scale of sound and the way in which that sound is produced mean that every aspect of playing these works has to be re-imagined and re-invented. On the one hand, the pianist may have in mind the fortepiano in its private or concert setting, on the other the chamber, orchestral or vocal forces that are referred to. Thus he has the option to adopt an intimate voice – or not; but given the many contradictory qualities and capabilities of the modern piano, no obligation either way. It is so that even with the best translation much is lost, but if the translator is himself more than an artisan something new will be gained too. The performer might even want to approach these works with a completely anachronistic attitude, irrespective of what he knows about their intended instrumentation and frame of reference.

Moreover it is inescapable that the ways in which the concert grand speaks and sings and dances – its arts of voicing, pedalling, accentuation, touch, cantabile fully and shrewdly manipulated – were perfected through the nineteenth century: i.e. it is inescapable that a performance practice for these works that engages the instrument’s full expressive potential needs to look beyond easy categories of ‘authentic’, or ‘modern’ or ‘historically-informed’. One might say that, when a pianist immerses himself in this music, ‘interpretation’ is only one of many tools that he takes in hand, but by no means an accurate description of what he may fashion in the end.

These highly finished works, terse in utterance, even the more extensive amongst them generally only around twenty minutes in length, yet very rich in activity, rich in personality and topoi have, particularly in their fast movements, a nervous energy and intensity that is rarely heard in piano performances.

Friedrich Gulda’s recordings of ten sonatas are a notable exception; the Lily Krauss renditions are more cultured and varied but restless too in their quest for ever more nuances and surprises. But – this kind of wonderful unpredictability has generally not been evident in performances of these works. The development of the modern piano through the nineteenth century and, one has to concede, the impressive legacy of Beethoven’s sonatas with their robust treatment of the instrument, largely relegated Mozart’s solo piano works to the realm of pedagogy.

These days they are still used as a training ground for decoding, and learning reflex responses to the standard figurations of Viennese Classical music. It is not surprising that such treatment has engendered a ‘binary’ attitude to articulation and pulse in modern piano performances which rarely move beyond received notions. On sonorous concert instruments the relatively sparse textures of these works are treated with blanket restraint (presumably as an illustration that the performer is in command of the ‘style’), without the built-in tensions that render restraint powerful – producing precious, saccharine sonorities that project the music as no more than ‘antique’ art objects. Futhermore, the facile stereotype of Mozart as the epitome of elegance provides temptation for the pianist to perform the supposed seductive beauty of the music rather than its supposed character or feeling.

Two aspects of the scores are of special interest to pianists: ‘articulation’ marks, and dynamics markings. One of the pedagogical mores that also render the performance of these works didactic is an unimaginative, somewhat literalist approach to the slurs (‘bowings’) and different kinds of staccato marks that are found with unpredictable frequency on each page. The truth is that Mozart is anything but consistent with these markings – even to the extent that in some cases his quotation of the opening phrase of a work in his Thematic Catologue differs in these details from the autograph score. In any case, the way the modern instrument ‘speaks’ is so radically different from Mozart’s instruments that it is unthinkable that adherence to even a standardised style of articulation should ever take priority over the great varieties of touch and stress available to the pianist. Following from this it becomes imperative too to consider the implications for accentuation and emphasis of a fluent piano technique – kinetically very different from a fluent fortepiano technique.

Regarding dynamics one quickly observes that, in the first nine sonatas especially, Mozart somewhat obsessively marks, for the most part, f and p. Perhaps this is still, relatively early on in his career, a legacy of the less dynamically sensitive instruments he grew up with. Again, a literalist, binary reading can leave a somewhat blunt, unresponsive impression. However, the placement of these dynamics is extremely telling in that they very often imply phrasings and groupings that the notes on their own do not: more evidence of Mozart’s restless, ludic musical mind – relishing all types of assymetry – assymetry that seeks at least the illusion of clarification and balancing, thus propelling the music forward. A far cry from suavity on the one hand or prettiness on the other.

The piano sonatas fascinatingly oscillate between the domestic and the public, not only in their references, but – being by nature playful and thoughtful – also moving between that which includes the audience and that which does not. Vital is the image of the improviser/composer; so too the kind of open experimentation which is a result of abundant facility and an abundance of creativity.

Gulda provocatively posits that in the piano sonatas one finds ideas which, more or less a hundred Köchel numbers later, are essayed fully in the operas. Whether or not one chooses to regard these pieces from such a vantage point, it is true that, perhaps because the stakes are not quite as high as they are in the Olympian, large-scale works, and because Mozart was such a fine clavier-player himself, we sense with these pieces more than any others the touch of the craftsman’s hand itself. That is their special place: not central to the Mozart miracle, but revealing of it in a special way. How could they be other than a performer’s delight?

Towards a narrative

Viewed as a body of work, the Mozart piano sonatas present a particularly neat picture. A chronological survey is rewarding, since the sonatas represent all the major stylistic and emotional changes in Mozart’s mature career. And the earliest of them date from his twentieth year, by which time their composer had already gained tight control of his materials. From the outset each of the sonatas has a clearly defined identity – as always with Mozart the impression being that the choice of key is indeed key. The writing is concentrated, never wasteful, with plenty of contrast in register and texture, the approach to the keyboard is virtuosic but not at the cost of ‘expression’, and all the significant cadential and thematic junctures in the music are apparently effortlessly in relief.

Those that precede Mozart’s handwritten catalogue of his own works (i.e. up to the B-flat sonata K. 333) fall naturally into three distinct groups, markedly different in character from each other whilst boasting an impressive internal variety: The relatively late appearance of solo sonatas in Mozart’s oeuvre (K. 279-284, Munich, 1775) is significant both in that they denote a departure from his numerous early works for keyboard with violin accompaniment, and that, for the first time, he sets down on paper a type of work which previously, one presumes, he had only improvised.

Mozart often performed these pieces on his tours, and no doubt played some of them on harpsichords too. The frequency of archaic f and p contrasts can perhaps be read as testimony that Mozart had yet to come to terms with emerging possibilities of shading on new keyboard instruments of the day. In Deutsche Chronik of 27 April 1775 the then-celebrated Captain Beecke’s playing receives praise over Mozart’s for its “agility, grace … sweetness”. By 1777 however, Mozart’s mother could report from Mannheim that her son’s playing was regarded as superior in “beauty of tone, quality and execution” even though Beecke had been playing there too.

The first six sonatas, one in C, three in flat keys, and two in sharps ones, immediately illustrate Mozart’s brilliant powers of free-association. Quick successions of seemingly independent, sometimes incongruous, ideas are skilfully connected, elided, balanced to leave the impression of cohesive argument. The two tendencies – the one to enjoy each new event in its own right, the other to give each element its due proportion in relation to the whole – with their simultaneous tow, seem less like opposing imperatives in later works, especially those from Mozart’s Viennese period. Perhaps because there the delicate ambiguities of voice-leading and phrasing, of rhythmic and harmonic polarity, become so dense as to form a web complete in itself. But, in the works from the Salzburg years the experience is still decidedly of unity-in-spite-of-variety.

The last sonata in this set, composed for the Baron von Dürnitz and sometimes bearing his name in programmes, is remarkably sonorous and its finale is one of Mozart’s richest variation sets – it is also the longest movement in all the sonatas. This work (the only Mozart sonata Glenn Gould seems to have approved of wholly) stands apart from its five companions; its grandeur appears to look forward to a different manner – and indeed, throughout the next three sonatas (K. 309 and 311, Mannheim, 1777 and K. 310, Paris, 1778) it is clear that Mozart was experimenting with new keyboard sounds. The urbane, extroverted nature of the Mannheim works reflects contact with that city’s famously impressive orchestra; Leopold Mozart mentions the “rather artificial Mannheim style” in connection with K. 309.

The sense of expansion in scale is continued in the A minor sonata, K. 310, but here the richness and sheer effectiveness of sonority are subjected with complete success to the traumatic emotional content of the work. In fact, the sonata represents the kind of leap of the imagination that can only be partly explained through understanding of the professional influences and personal experiences that accompanied its conception – it simply is without precedent.  Maynard Solomon writes beautifully how its Andante cantabile con espressione, which describes the profound disturbance of an idyllic state before it is ecstatically recaptured, becomes the archetype for many of Mozart’s greatest slow movements. Its astonishing Presto finale strikes a fatalistic tone, stark forte chords bleakly arresting its breathless dance in the last bars.

All the subsequent sonatas date from Mozart’s Viennese period (roughly the last decade of his life). The first four of these (K. 330-3, 1783) significantly do not open with overt gestural pronouncements as in the preceding four sonatas, but with ingenuous lyrical ideas, emblematic in a larger sense of the harmoniousness and fluency that pervade throughout. It may be said that by now Mozart maintains the generous, humane buffo perspective that is the hallmark of his mature language. The brittleness of some of the keyboard writing in the earlier sonatas is largely absent. Each of these sonatas has its particular, carefully modulated tonal hue, its own balancing of the thoughtful, the affecting and the playful. The F major sonata, K. 332, for instance, boasts a spectacular digital pianistic display across the entire range of the keyboard in its finale to balance the very specific orchestral sonorities and vocal style that are conjured in the opening and second movements respectively. The Rondo alla Turca which concludes the A major sonata, K. 331 is both a clever coup and the natural fruition of the ‘exotic’ tendencies of the preceding movements.

Citing the C minor sonata (K. 457, 1784) as a work which foreshadows Beethoven’s ‘C minor mood’ is a popular critical misconception: the raw energy and wilfulness that drive Beethoven’s allegros are largely absent. In fact, the more vital forte sections scattered through the fast movements here act as a kind of frame to uphold a work beset by a sinking sense of doubt. Most typical are the nervous changes of mood and the frequent, enigmatic, often disconcerting, caesuras. The Fantasy (K. 475, 1785) was subsequently composed as an elaborate prelude to this sonata. Mozart here indulges in some of the wayward timbral contrasts and harmonic, and enharmonic, manoeuvres of the Sturm und Drang keyboard tradition; at times the heavy brushstrokes and ceremonial gravity are even reminiscent of his minor key church music. It is evidently a carefully constructed piece, with one of Mozart’s most beautifully paced endings, the title referring to the stylistic quirks of a genre rather than to haphazard improvisation.

It was presumably Mozart’s haste in preparing a sonata for his new employer, Joseph II that prompted his use of an earlier rondo (K. 494, 1786) as finale to a newly composed Allegro and Andante (K. 533, 1788). The first movement is one of Mozart’s virtuosic essays in combining the ‘grammar’ of a sonata allegro with contrapuntal and pseudo-contrapuntal techniques, enabling all sorts of rhetorical games. Here the very effortlessness of the dance between the two hands attains the quality of profundity. The slow movement is perhaps the most complex in the sonatas in its changes of moods, its harsh sayings eventually resolved in a state of rapture. The choice of the fairly straightforward rondo is often labelled disappointing after the ripeness and depth of the other two movements. Or one might view it as a master-stroke: a clearing of the palate after some strong contrapuntal and harmonic flavour. Seen in that light, the cadenza-like passage-work and the dramatic sweep of stretti on the penultimate page (both insertions from 1788), the wind serenade-like episode in F minor, and the dark colouring in the bass-register at the conclusion of the piece, are just enough to put into question the apparent innocuousness of the rondo-theme.

In the last three sonatas (K. 545, 1788; K. 570 and K. 576, 1789) the vivid extremes of K. 533 are rare. Although Mozart composed them in his early thirties they can be described as ‘late’ in that they are the product of a creativity that has already reached fullest expression and that they are written from a perspective that is in a sense beyond achievement; that is, beyond the need to ‘prove’ anything. Mozart’s later works do not set out to critique his own earlier achievements, turn away from them in radically new directions, or turn inward unconcerned with his audience – for that he died just too early – but a late quality they very clearly exemplify is that they often seem to take economy of writing to an extreme. Here are no ostentatious displays; rather these works unfold within very carefully maintained spectra of possibility, demonstrating an absolutely precise knowledge of what is essential and what is not.

The slow movement of K. 545, for instance, could not possibly but be the work of a past master, showing how apparently the simplest means can be handled to their most acute expressive effect.

These last three sonatas belong to a group of Mozart’s instrumental works to which Hermann Hesse’s description of the “cheerfulness” of Classical music perhaps applies best. This cheerfulness, characterised by order and lucidity, is “aware of the tragedy of the human condition” but finds higher joy in a purer kind of beauty. Spectacular effects of light and darkness are replaced by more subtle shifts in mood: in the faster movements rich sonorities are generally eschewed in favour of two-part writing which borders (in sometimes very witty ways) on the sketchy; the slow movements now have a retrospective quality – of remembered rather than immediate experience – of experience reflected on, and clarification gained. So, when Mozart died young, with many circumstances in his professional and personal life unresolved, his artistic career had in a sense come full circle – or so it seems to us, since these later instrumental works speak anew with a childlike freshness, directness, and also vulnerability.

MOZART COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS – HIROAKI TAKENOUCHI – CONCERT 5 @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 25 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Hiroaki Takenouchi performs the
complete cycle of the Mozart Piano Sonatas.
5 concerts in collaboration with the Embassy of Japan in South Africa.

Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00; Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 & Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00
Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00; Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00

To experience live performances, featuring the entire set of 18 piano sonatas by Mozart, is extremely rare in international terms.Brooklyn Theatre is very proud to host this project with the world famous Japanese pianist, Hiroaki Takenouchi. This will be the first project of its kind in South African music history. Takenouchi has added an additional work to 3 of the performances to balance the recitals time-wise. These are: The Fantasy in C minor K.475, Rondo in A minor K.511 and the Adagio in B minor K. 540.

Takenouchi’s visit is a veritable feast of Mozart’s music, as he will also be performing two Mozart piano concertos with the GPO.

Concert 1 – Mon. 23 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Sonata No.1 in C K.279
Fantasy in C minor K.475
Sonata No.14 in C minor K.457
Sonata No.12 in F K.332
Sonata No.9 in D K.311

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Concert 2 – Tues. 24 Sep. 11:00 – Book now

Sonata No.2 in F K.280
Sonata No.7 in C K.309
Sonata No.5 in G K.283
Sonata No.8 in A minor K.310

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Concert 3 – Tues. 24 Sep. 18:00 – Book now

Sonata No.3 in B flat K.281
Sonata No.10 in C K.330
Rondo in A minor K.511
Sonata No.11 in A K.331

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Concert 4 – Wed. 25 Sep. 14:00 – Book now

Sonata No.4 in E flat K.282
Sonata No.15 in F K.533/494
Sonata No.16 in C K.545
Sonata No.13 in B flat K.333

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Concert 5 – Wed. 25 Sep. 19:00 – Book now

Adagio in B minor K.540
Sonata No.6 in D K.284
Sonata No.17 in B flat K.570
Sonata No.18 in D K.576

Ticket prices

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R160
Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) R110

Brooklyn Theatre
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park
012-460-6033

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

Hiroaki Takenouchi – Bio

Heralded by The Times as “just the sort of champion the newest of new music needs”, while being praised as “impeccable in his pianism and unfailing in his idiomatic grasp” by Gramophone, Takenouchi’s curiosity and a natural penchant for integrity makes his playing and vast repertoire unique amongst his generation of pianists. His love for the music of classical masters – particularly Haydn, Beethoven and Chopin – sits side by side with his passion for the music of Medtner, lesser-known British composers such as Sterndale Bennett and Parry, and the contemporary repertoire.

As a soloist, Takenouchi has appeared on many concert platforms including Wigmore Hall, Tokyo Opera City and the South Bank Centre. He has also performed at festivals in Bath, Cheltenham and Salzburg and given recitals in the UK, Japan, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Italy and Canada. His more unusual recent projects include: a recital for the Rarities of Piano Repertoire Festival in Husum (Germany), a BBC Four documentary The Prince and the Composer on the life and music of Parry alongside HRH The Prince of Wales, and BBC Radio 3’s Composer of the Week, for which Hiroaki recorded solo piano works by Sterndale Bennett (broadcast in April 2016) and Alexander Campbell Mackenzie (broadcast in February 2017).

Takenouchi’s discography includes Schumann & Sterndale Bennett (Artalinna), Haydn: 4 Sonatas (Artalinna), Cosmos Haptic: Contemporary Piano Music from Japan (LORELT), as well as world première recordings of works by James Dillon (NMC), Edwin Roxburgh (NMC) and Jeremy Dale Roberts (LORELT). Upcoming recordings in 2019 include two-piano arrangements of Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony and of piano sonatas by Chopin and Liszt for Lyrita, as part of the Parnassius Piano Duo with Simon Callaghan. The duo has also recorded works by Percy Sherwood and Parry (Lyrita), and two-piano arrangements of Delius’s orchestral works (SOMM).

The Russian composer Georgy Catoire’s music is somewhat neglected today but Takenouchi is a passionate advocate of his Piano Concerto and recorded the work with Martin Yates and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Their recording was released in 2012 on Dutton Epoch along with Percy Sherwood’s Piano Concerto, in another world première  recording, which garnered excellent reviews in the press. Towards the end of 2016 Takenouchi went on to give the modern-day première of the Piano Concerto with London Phoenix Orchestra, the first performance since its première in 1920 at The Proms.

At the end of 2018, Takenouchi was invited to become a Blüthner artist, and he has recently embarked on his latest project, to perform all the piano sonatas by Mozart (UK and South Africa) and Medtner (UK) in the coming seasons.

Takenouchi teaches piano at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (Glasgow). He also returns every summer to give masterclasses at the Ingenium International Music Academy (UK).

—————————————————-

MOZART’S PIANO SONATAS

Daniel-Ben Pienaar

Enthusiastically championed by artists like Lily Krauss, derided by others, most notoriously Glenn Gould, Mozart’s piano sonatas occupy a special position in his output. Unlike Beethoven’s sonatas, these works are not central to their composer’s achievement. Nevertheless, they are unique as a polished body of works for a single instrument: and this is especially significant in Mozart’s case.

His contributions in all major genres are celebrated. In the great operatic comedies and the Singspiels he revels in the very artificiality of the stage to create real emotional states in his characters, and to portray true relationships. In the great concertos his piano soloist becomes an incandescent Everyman in the ‘social’ context of the individual wind instruments and the collective body of strings – quite unlike its often heroic, combative role in later concertos. In the late symphonies he finds an epic voice unimagined before in orchestral music, infusing exchanges of material and contrasts of mood with an apparently celebratory logic – a logic the essence of which remains elusive upon examination. The mature quintets and quartets, impassioned in unified sonority and expressive intent, are also exquisitely, graphically contrapuntal in the kaleidoscopic complexity of responses and reactions between and amongst the instruments. Throughout the large body of violin-and-piano sonatas a rapt dialogue between the I and the Other unfolds.

So, Mozart’s acute sensitivity to different instrumental and vocal timbres and his virtuosity at juxtaposing and reconciling the most unlikely materials in an apparently effortless and natural way, place him supreme as creator of characters – whether that be in his operas, or when he personifies instruments themselves. That is central to virtually all his greatest achievements. And it is obvious to even the naïve listener that dialogic interaction is crucial to the ebb and flow of the music – never more so than in the dramas, games and discourse of sonata.

Such dialogue can be heard in these piano sonatas too, but since Mozart cannot here characterise the instrument itself in the context of other instruments, he makes use of contrasts in dynamics, registers and textures to enable reference to other instrumental and vocal forces, and genres, enabling make-believe exchanges. By contrast, in the piano concertos, however varied the role of the piano may be, the soloist in that context has a unified identity, inevitably rendering the piano sonority more homogenous than should be the experience when listening to the works for piano alone.

Here, then, we find concentrations of symphonic material, or concerto tutti/solo duality and virtuoso passage work, or tender wind serenade exchanges, ardent string quartets: but we do so through musical simile. Simile rather than metaphor, since the paradox is that all this is cast in an eminently ‘pianistic’ idiom in a way which would resist effective transcription. Of course complex cross-reference like this abounds in Mozart’s language in general, but what is special about these works is that a single player has to vivify the implied exchanges between ‘instruments’ and ‘characters’ – and all in an unquestionably domestic or, at least intimate, setting. These works may at times refer to public styles of holding forth, or have large-scale implications by virtue of depth of content, but in their original instrumentation they demand quiet listening.

This leads to some difficult questions for those who wish to play the Mozart sonatas on a modern concert grand. Its identity as the vehicle of the recital and concerto virtuoso, its scale of sound and the way in which that sound is produced mean that every aspect of playing these works has to be re-imagined and re-invented. On the one hand, the pianist may have in mind the fortepiano in its private or concert setting, on the other the chamber, orchestral or vocal forces that are referred to. Thus he has the option to adopt an intimate voice – or not; but given the many contradictory qualities and capabilities of the modern piano, no obligation either way. It is so that even with the best translation much is lost, but if the translator is himself more than an artisan something new will be gained too. The performer might even want to approach these works with a completely anachronistic attitude, irrespective of what he knows about their intended instrumentation and frame of reference.

Moreover it is inescapable that the ways in which the concert grand speaks and sings and dances – its arts of voicing, pedalling, accentuation, touch, cantabile fully and shrewdly manipulated – were perfected through the nineteenth century: i.e. it is inescapable that a performance practice for these works that engages the instrument’s full expressive potential needs to look beyond easy categories of ‘authentic’, or ‘modern’ or ‘historically-informed’. One might say that, when a pianist immerses himself in this music, ‘interpretation’ is only one of many tools that he takes in hand, but by no means an accurate description of what he may fashion in the end.

These highly finished works, terse in utterance, even the more extensive amongst them generally only around twenty minutes in length, yet very rich in activity, rich in personality and topoi have, particularly in their fast movements, a nervous energy and intensity that is rarely heard in piano performances.

Friedrich Gulda’s recordings of ten sonatas are a notable exception; the Lily Krauss renditions are more cultured and varied but restless too in their quest for ever more nuances and surprises. But – this kind of wonderful unpredictability has generally not been evident in performances of these works. The development of the modern piano through the nineteenth century and, one has to concede, the impressive legacy of Beethoven’s sonatas with their robust treatment of the instrument, largely relegated Mozart’s solo piano works to the realm of pedagogy.

These days they are still used as a training ground for decoding, and learning reflex responses to the standard figurations of Viennese Classical music. It is not surprising that such treatment has engendered a ‘binary’ attitude to articulation and pulse in modern piano performances which rarely move beyond received notions. On sonorous concert instruments the relatively sparse textures of these works are treated with blanket restraint (presumably as an illustration that the performer is in command of the ‘style’), without the built-in tensions that render restraint powerful – producing precious, saccharine sonorities that project the music as no more than ‘antique’ art objects. Futhermore, the facile stereotype of Mozart as the epitome of elegance provides temptation for the pianist to perform the supposed seductive beauty of the music rather than its supposed character or feeling.

Two aspects of the scores are of special interest to pianists: ‘articulation’ marks, and dynamics markings. One of the pedagogical mores that also render the performance of these works didactic is an unimaginative, somewhat literalist approach to the slurs (‘bowings’) and different kinds of staccato marks that are found with unpredictable frequency on each page. The truth is that Mozart is anything but consistent with these markings – even to the extent that in some cases his quotation of the opening phrase of a work in his Thematic Catologue differs in these details from the autograph score. In any case, the way the modern instrument ‘speaks’ is so radically different from Mozart’s instruments that it is unthinkable that adherence to even a standardised style of articulation should ever take priority over the great varieties of touch and stress available to the pianist. Following from this it becomes imperative too to consider the implications for accentuation and emphasis of a fluent piano technique – kinetically very different from a fluent fortepiano technique.

Regarding dynamics one quickly observes that, in the first nine sonatas especially, Mozart somewhat obsessively marks, for the most part, f and p. Perhaps this is still, relatively early on in his career, a legacy of the less dynamically sensitive instruments he grew up with. Again, a literalist, binary reading can leave a somewhat blunt, unresponsive impression. However, the placement of these dynamics is extremely telling in that they very often imply phrasings and groupings that the notes on their own do not: more evidence of Mozart’s restless, ludic musical mind – relishing all types of assymetry – assymetry that seeks at least the illusion of clarification and balancing, thus propelling the music forward. A far cry from suavity on the one hand or prettiness on the other.

The piano sonatas fascinatingly oscillate between the domestic and the public, not only in their references, but – being by nature playful and thoughtful – also moving between that which includes the audience and that which does not. Vital is the image of the improviser/composer; so too the kind of open experimentation which is a result of abundant facility and an abundance of creativity.

Gulda provocatively posits that in the piano sonatas one finds ideas which, more or less a hundred Köchel numbers later, are essayed fully in the operas. Whether or not one chooses to regard these pieces from such a vantage point, it is true that, perhaps because the stakes are not quite as high as they are in the Olympian, large-scale works, and because Mozart was such a fine clavier-player himself, we sense with these pieces more than any others the touch of the craftsman’s hand itself. That is their special place: not central to the Mozart miracle, but revealing of it in a special way. How could they be other than a performer’s delight?

Towards a narrative

Viewed as a body of work, the Mozart piano sonatas present a particularly neat picture. A chronological survey is rewarding, since the sonatas represent all the major stylistic and emotional changes in Mozart’s mature career. And the earliest of them date from his twentieth year, by which time their composer had already gained tight control of his materials. From the outset each of the sonatas has a clearly defined identity – as always with Mozart the impression being that the choice of key is indeed key. The writing is concentrated, never wasteful, with plenty of contrast in register and texture, the approach to the keyboard is virtuosic but not at the cost of ‘expression’, and all the significant cadential and thematic junctures in the music are apparently effortlessly in relief.

Those that precede Mozart’s handwritten catalogue of his own works (i.e. up to the B-flat sonata K. 333) fall naturally into three distinct groups, markedly different in character from each other whilst boasting an impressive internal variety: The relatively late appearance of solo sonatas in Mozart’s oeuvre (K. 279-284, Munich, 1775) is significant both in that they denote a departure from his numerous early works for keyboard with violin accompaniment, and that, for the first time, he sets down on paper a type of work which previously, one presumes, he had only improvised.

Mozart often performed these pieces on his tours, and no doubt played some of them on harpsichords too. The frequency of archaic f and p contrasts can perhaps be read as testimony that Mozart had yet to come to terms with emerging possibilities of shading on new keyboard instruments of the day. In Deutsche Chronik of 27 April 1775 the then-celebrated Captain Beecke’s playing receives praise over Mozart’s for its “agility, grace … sweetness”. By 1777 however, Mozart’s mother could report from Mannheim that her son’s playing was regarded as superior in “beauty of tone, quality and execution” even though Beecke had been playing there too.

The first six sonatas, one in C, three in flat keys, and two in sharps ones, immediately illustrate Mozart’s brilliant powers of free-association. Quick successions of seemingly independent, sometimes incongruous, ideas are skilfully connected, elided, balanced to leave the impression of cohesive argument. The two tendencies – the one to enjoy each new event in its own right, the other to give each element its due proportion in relation to the whole – with their simultaneous tow, seem less like opposing imperatives in later works, especially those from Mozart’s Viennese period. Perhaps because there the delicate ambiguities of voice-leading and phrasing, of rhythmic and harmonic polarity, become so dense as to form a web complete in itself. But, in the works from the Salzburg years the experience is still decidedly of unity-in-spite-of-variety.

The last sonata in this set, composed for the Baron von Dürnitz and sometimes bearing his name in programmes, is remarkably sonorous and its finale is one of Mozart’s richest variation sets – it is also the longest movement in all the sonatas. This work (the only Mozart sonata Glenn Gould seems to have approved of wholly) stands apart from its five companions; its grandeur appears to look forward to a different manner – and indeed, throughout the next three sonatas (K. 309 and 311, Mannheim, 1777 and K. 310, Paris, 1778) it is clear that Mozart was experimenting with new keyboard sounds. The urbane, extroverted nature of the Mannheim works reflects contact with that city’s famously impressive orchestra; Leopold Mozart mentions the “rather artificial Mannheim style” in connection with K. 309.

The sense of expansion in scale is continued in the A minor sonata, K. 310, but here the richness and sheer effectiveness of sonority are subjected with complete success to the traumatic emotional content of the work. In fact, the sonata represents the kind of leap of the imagination that can only be partly explained through understanding of the professional influences and personal experiences that accompanied its conception – it simply is without precedent.  Maynard Solomon writes beautifully how its Andante cantabile con espressione, which describes the profound disturbance of an idyllic state before it is ecstatically recaptured, becomes the archetype for many of Mozart’s greatest slow movements. Its astonishing Presto finale strikes a fatalistic tone, stark forte chords bleakly arresting its breathless dance in the last bars.

All the subsequent sonatas date from Mozart’s Viennese period (roughly the last decade of his life). The first four of these (K. 330-3, 1783) significantly do not open with overt gestural pronouncements as in the preceding four sonatas, but with ingenuous lyrical ideas, emblematic in a larger sense of the harmoniousness and fluency that pervade throughout. It may be said that by now Mozart maintains the generous, humane buffo perspective that is the hallmark of his mature language. The brittleness of some of the keyboard writing in the earlier sonatas is largely absent. Each of these sonatas has its particular, carefully modulated tonal hue, its own balancing of the thoughtful, the affecting and the playful. The F major sonata, K. 332, for instance, boasts a spectacular digital pianistic display across the entire range of the keyboard in its finale to balance the very specific orchestral sonorities and vocal style that are conjured in the opening and second movements respectively. The Rondo alla Turca which concludes the A major sonata, K. 331 is both a clever coup and the natural fruition of the ‘exotic’ tendencies of the preceding movements.

Citing the C minor sonata (K. 457, 1784) as a work which foreshadows Beethoven’s ‘C minor mood’ is a popular critical misconception: the raw energy and wilfulness that drive Beethoven’s allegros are largely absent. In fact, the more vital forte sections scattered through the fast movements here act as a kind of frame to uphold a work beset by a sinking sense of doubt. Most typical are the nervous changes of mood and the frequent, enigmatic, often disconcerting, caesuras. The Fantasy (K. 475, 1785) was subsequently composed as an elaborate prelude to this sonata. Mozart here indulges in some of the wayward timbral contrasts and harmonic, and enharmonic, manoeuvres of the Sturm und Drang keyboard tradition; at times the heavy brushstrokes and ceremonial gravity are even reminiscent of his minor key church music. It is evidently a carefully constructed piece, with one of Mozart’s most beautifully paced endings, the title referring to the stylistic quirks of a genre rather than to haphazard improvisation.

It was presumably Mozart’s haste in preparing a sonata for his new employer, Joseph II that prompted his use of an earlier rondo (K. 494, 1786) as finale to a newly composed Allegro and Andante (K. 533, 1788). The first movement is one of Mozart’s virtuosic essays in combining the ‘grammar’ of a sonata allegro with contrapuntal and pseudo-contrapuntal techniques, enabling all sorts of rhetorical games. Here the very effortlessness of the dance between the two hands attains the quality of profundity. The slow movement is perhaps the most complex in the sonatas in its changes of moods, its harsh sayings eventually resolved in a state of rapture. The choice of the fairly straightforward rondo is often labelled disappointing after the ripeness and depth of the other two movements. Or one might view it as a master-stroke: a clearing of the palate after some strong contrapuntal and harmonic flavour. Seen in that light, the cadenza-like passage-work and the dramatic sweep of stretti on the penultimate page (both insertions from 1788), the wind serenade-like episode in F minor, and the dark colouring in the bass-register at the conclusion of the piece, are just enough to put into question the apparent innocuousness of the rondo-theme.

In the last three sonatas (K. 545, 1788; K. 570 and K. 576, 1789) the vivid extremes of K. 533 are rare. Although Mozart composed them in his early thirties they can be described as ‘late’ in that they are the product of a creativity that has already reached fullest expression and that they are written from a perspective that is in a sense beyond achievement; that is, beyond the need to ‘prove’ anything. Mozart’s later works do not set out to critique his own earlier achievements, turn away from them in radically new directions, or turn inward unconcerned with his audience – for that he died just too early – but a late quality they very clearly exemplify is that they often seem to take economy of writing to an extreme. Here are no ostentatious displays; rather these works unfold within very carefully maintained spectra of possibility, demonstrating an absolutely precise knowledge of what is essential and what is not.

The slow movement of K. 545, for instance, could not possibly but be the work of a past master, showing how apparently the simplest means can be handled to their most acute expressive effect.

These last three sonatas belong to a group of Mozart’s instrumental works to which Hermann Hesse’s description of the “cheerfulness” of Classical music perhaps applies best. This cheerfulness, characterised by order and lucidity, is “aware of the tragedy of the human condition” but finds higher joy in a purer kind of beauty. Spectacular effects of light and darkness are replaced by more subtle shifts in mood: in the faster movements rich sonorities are generally eschewed in favour of two-part writing which borders (in sometimes very witty ways) on the sketchy; the slow movements now have a retrospective quality – of remembered rather than immediate experience – of experience reflected on, and clarification gained. So, when Mozart died young, with many circumstances in his professional and personal life unresolved, his artistic career had in a sense come full circle – or so it seems to us, since these later instrumental works speak anew with a childlike freshness, directness, and also vulnerability.

Karen Zoid @ Atterbury Theatre
Sep 25 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Karen Zoid

Wed. 25 Sep. 20:00
Thurs. 26 Sep. 20:00
Fri. 27 Sep. 20:00

Karen Zoid’s live stage shows are always a memorable experience. Be the first to hear songs from her new album, as well as some old favorites. Her razor-sharp lyrics, contagious stage personality and unmistakable voice keep audiences on their feet every night.

Ticketsales opening soon. 

Sep
26
Thu
Die Haas en die Skilpad @ Pierneefteater
Sep 26 @ 10:00 am – 11:10 am

Die Haas en die Skilpad

weeKIDZ Produksies
Donderdag 26 September 10h00
Vrydag 27 September  10h00

Saterdag 28 September  10h00
R70 volwassenes / R60 kinders
012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

70 minute

Pouse:  Ja

Hierdie resies tussen die astrante Haas en die slim Skilpad het ’n hele paar kinkels en draaie en sorg vir groot pret vir groot en klein.

Homecoming Africa @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 26 @ 5:00 pm – 11:45 pm

HomeComing Africa is the second event year of an eventing revolution set to take the continent by storm. A celebration of African music, culture and lifestyle as well as the building of the cultural bridge between international artists and local support bases.

HCA is really an opportunity for Homecoming Events to break down the walls of what we deem to be a success and encouraging others in similar positions as us to do the same. Its us not saying ‘ Africa is the future” as lip service but actually investing in proving that it is its about breaking the stereotypes about black people and entertaining the dream that will build a fresh bridge with the international community.

Pretoria – The City of Tshwane’s much loved Homecoming Africa festival is back!
Homecoming Events said they were gearing up to provide the ultimate in music, service and comedy during the three-day festival headlined by Kwesta, A-Reece, Boity, Moozlie, Zakes Bantwini, Da Capo and many more.
 
The festival will again make the Voortrekker Monument its home for three days, from  September 26 to 28.
Katlego Malatji, managing director for Homecoming Events said attendees can expect an experience out of the ordinary. 
 
“Homecoming Africa will launch their community service initiative that is aimed at giving back on the first day of the festival. 
 
“This festival will bring a significant shift in the way we view events, social responsibilities and music on the continent, it is the start of something very special.
 
“The second day will consist of a comedy night where local comedians will get an opportunity to showcase the growing comedic community in Pretoria and the rest of South Africa,” Malatji said.
 
Music lovers will be spoilt for choice from Hip Hop, House, to Kwaito genres on the last day. 
 
Tickets range from R150 to R650.

A file picture of last year’s Homecoming Africa festival. Picture: Supplied

NIGHT TOUR VOORTREKKER MONUMENT @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 26 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

NIGHT TOUR VOORTREKKER MONUMENT

Enjoy an evening tour of the Voortrekker Monument with a specialist guide or use this opportunity to take photographs. Sherry and snacks on arrival.

Maximum 35 persons, minimum 15 persons
R200 per person (18 years and older, only)

26 September at 18:00

Secure parking
Wheelchair Accessible

RSVP with Thea at thea@vtm.org.za / 012 326 6770 before 15 September

Karen Zoid @ Atterbury Theatre
Sep 26 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Karen Zoid

Wed. 25 Sep. 20:00
Thurs. 26 Sep. 20:00
Fri. 27 Sep. 20:00

Karen Zoid’s live stage shows are always a memorable experience. Be the first to hear songs from her new album, as well as some old favorites. Her razor-sharp lyrics, contagious stage personality and unmistakable voice keep audiences on their feet every night.

Ticketsales opening soon. 

Sep
27
Fri
Maria Pienaar “Warp, weft, woof” @ Pretoria Arts Association
Sep 27 @ 9:00 am – Oct 5 @ 6:00 pm

27 September 2019 to 16 October 2019

Maria Pienaar
“Warp, weft, woof”
An exhibition of mixed media works

Gallery Hours

Tuesday to Friday:  09h00 to 18h00
Saturday:  09h00 to 13h00
Sunday 6 October:  10h00 to 13h00

Die Haas en die Skilpad @ Pierneefteater
Sep 27 @ 10:00 am – 11:10 am

Die Haas en die Skilpad

weeKIDZ Produksies
Donderdag 26 September 10h00
Vrydag 27 September  10h00

Saterdag 28 September  10h00
R70 volwassenes / R60 kinders
012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

70 minute

Pouse:  Ja

Hierdie resies tussen die astrante Haas en die slim Skilpad het ’n hele paar kinkels en draaie en sorg vir groot pret vir groot en klein.

Homecoming Africa @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 27 @ 5:00 pm – 11:45 pm

HomeComing Africa is the second event year of an eventing revolution set to take the continent by storm. A celebration of African music, culture and lifestyle as well as the building of the cultural bridge between international artists and local support bases.

HCA is really an opportunity for Homecoming Events to break down the walls of what we deem to be a success and encouraging others in similar positions as us to do the same. Its us not saying ‘ Africa is the future” as lip service but actually investing in proving that it is its about breaking the stereotypes about black people and entertaining the dream that will build a fresh bridge with the international community.

Pretoria – The City of Tshwane’s much loved Homecoming Africa festival is back!
Homecoming Events said they were gearing up to provide the ultimate in music, service and comedy during the three-day festival headlined by Kwesta, A-Reece, Boity, Moozlie, Zakes Bantwini, Da Capo and many more.
 
The festival will again make the Voortrekker Monument its home for three days, from  September 26 to 28.
Katlego Malatji, managing director for Homecoming Events said attendees can expect an experience out of the ordinary. 
 
“Homecoming Africa will launch their community service initiative that is aimed at giving back on the first day of the festival. 
 
“This festival will bring a significant shift in the way we view events, social responsibilities and music on the continent, it is the start of something very special.
 
“The second day will consist of a comedy night where local comedians will get an opportunity to showcase the growing comedic community in Pretoria and the rest of South Africa,” Malatji said.
 
Music lovers will be spoilt for choice from Hip Hop, House, to Kwaito genres on the last day. 
 
Tickets range from R150 to R650.

A file picture of last year’s Homecoming Africa festival. Picture: Supplied

Karen Zoid @ Atterbury Theatre
Sep 27 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Karen Zoid

Wed. 25 Sep. 20:00
Thurs. 26 Sep. 20:00
Fri. 27 Sep. 20:00

Karen Zoid’s live stage shows are always a memorable experience. Be the first to hear songs from her new album, as well as some old favorites. Her razor-sharp lyrics, contagious stage personality and unmistakable voice keep audiences on their feet every night.

Ticketsales opening soon. 

Sep
28
Sat
ARTS AND CRAFTS AT GREENLYN @ Greenlyn Village Centre
Sep 28 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn – the Rainbow Country at its best!
Written by Prof. Piet Meiring

If you want to know a country and meet its people as they really are, go and find a street market in London, Amsterdam, Berlin or New York.  You will see it all, right before your eyes! It happens in South Africa as well.  Do you want to experience the Rainbow Country and its people, at their most festive and charming, make your way to the Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn, in Pretoria.

Entering the gates on a typical Saturday morning, you find yourself walking into a food market with stalls catering to every conceivable taste and thirst. The real treat, however, is wandering through the arts and crafts market, together with thousands of visitors, local as well as from overseas, discovering the beauty and the colours of South Africa.  Walking up and down the lanes – Pepper Lane, Willow Lane, Acacia Lane or Garden Route Lane – you may browse at more than seventy stalls. And the kids? Mom and Dad may drop them of at Piccolo Lane with its many games and famous water fountain – guaranteed to keep them out of trouble.

A wide variety of crafts from all over South Africa as well as from other African countries is on offer. While admiring the multi-coloured paintings and elegant sculptures, you may be able to talk to the artists themselves, who will gladly discuss their works with you. For the ladies and the girls there are gold jewellery to admire, together with colourful beadwork, copper bracelets, beautifully painted cloth, as well as hand crafted porcelain. And for the men and the boys there is a variety of home-made wooden guns and slings, leather work and exquisite, soft, Nguni-skin carpets. And, if you have to send a letter to your mother in law, paper made from elephant dung may come in handy! For the health-conscious, a number of stalls are devoted to herbs and medicines and creams, for every taste and every ill.

The heart of the market is the Brooklyn Theatre, where local as well as international artists regularly perform. The theatre and its productions are lauded by many as an important contributor the weekly South African musical calendar. Often on a Saturday morning visitors to the market are invited to a Limelight Concert, where budding artists and youth choirs demonstrate their skills during 20-40 minute programmes. The iSalon Music Shop, part of the theatre complex, boasts the largest selection of classical, popular-classical as well as Jazz CDs and DVDs. And if you are searching for sheet music or for instruments, from a simple recorder to a grand piano, this is the address you want.

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn is at the corner of Edison Street and Mc Kenzie Street in Brooklyn, in easy access from the main traffic arteries in Pretoria. The market is wheel chair-friendly and dogs (on leash) are welcome. Market hours are Saturdays from 08:00 till 14:00. Once every quarter an evening market is held as well.

For more information, please contact us by phone 060 976 8113 or by e-mail artsandcraftsatgreenlyn@gmail.com.

Heart Puppet Show @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 28 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Heart Puppet Show
Saturday 28 September 11:00 – 12:00
www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

HeartCity@25 puppet show was created in collaboration with Swannie Swanevelder Puppet Shows, from Petrus Productions.
This is a mobile puppet show visiting nursery and primary schools and festivals in order to inform, educate and empower babies, toddlers and the younger Primary school generation on a healthy heart.
Where is the heart situated inside the human body, how does it work, how can we contribute to its functioning. How do we keep it healthy and fit? All of these and more are topics being addressed through our puppet show.
The kids always leave with a happy and healthy heart

Ticket sales:

Saturday 28 September 11:00 – 12:00

R100 Parents
R80 Children / Toddlers

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

Heartcity@25 is a registered, private medical company that aims to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease globally through an interdisciplinary rehabilitation program and preventative strategies that incorporates both medical as well as commercial entities to address secondary- and lifestyle risk factors, metabolic disease and cardiovascular death.

We aim to achieve this by establishing a phase 3 rehabilitation unit that serves all patients both recovering from cardiovascular surgery as well as those living with cardiovascular disease within an interdisciplinary domain. A patient network that has accessibility to evidence-based information and medical services, high end medical technology and support services that offers a foundation for lifelong sustainability and medical assistance.

Contact Us :
www.heartcity25.co.za
Email : info@heartcity25.co.za
Cell: 0722552960

Market @ The Sheds @ 012 Central
Sep 28 @ 11:00 am – 8:00 pm


28 September 2019
11:00 – 20:00

012 Central, 381 Helen Joseph Street, Pretoria CBD

R50 before 14:00, R100 thereafter.

Press release:

Capoeira! Samba! Frevo! Caiperhina! Churrasco! Açaí! Olà Pretoria!

Market@theSheds is going loco with an Afro-Brazilian Festival on Saturday 28 September! The Afro- Brazilian Festival focuses on the synergies between Southern Africa and Brazil and provides a showcase of local music, art, food, design and entertainment.

The event is filled with live music, cultural performances and all sorts of exhibitions with an unmissable line-up of African and Brazilian music contributing to the cultural fusion of the day.

#marketatthesheds #capitalcollective #discoverthetruecoloursofthecapital #foodie #music #live #entertainment #design #fashion #art #lovemyhood #events #ptown

Die Haas en die Skilpad @ Pierneefteater
Sep 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:10 am

Die Haas en die Skilpad

weeKIDZ Produksies
Donderdag 26 September 10h00
Vrydag 27 September  10h00

Saterdag 28 September  10h00
R70 volwassenes / R60 kinders
012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

70 minute

Pouse:  Ja

Hierdie resies tussen die astrante Haas en die slim Skilpad het ’n hele paar kinkels en draaie en sorg vir groot pret vir groot en klein.

FAK Liedjies Kom sing saam met Jean-Pierre Verster @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 28 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

FAK LIEDJIES! Kom sing saam met Jean-Pierre Verster
Saterdag 28 September 15:00 – 16:00

Wie onthou nog daardie lekker saamsing FAK liedjies om ’n kampvuur?

Is dit vir jou ’n deel van ons Afrikanerwees wat jy mis?

Hou jy van sing?

Wil jy hê jou kinders moet aan al die gunstelinge blootgestel word?

Kom kuier by ons in Brooklyn Theatre vir ’n prettige uurtjie van saamsingpret vir die hele familie!

Volksliedjies van vroeër, soos Die Oukraalliedjie, Bolandse Nooientjie, Suikerbossie, Liewe Maan, Ek soek na my Dina vat hande met luisterliedjies uit die splinternuwe FAK wat ook die mooiste liedjies insluit van Koos Du Plessis, Sonja Herholdt, Laurika Rauch en vele meer. Jy kan jou eie FAK saambring as jy wil. Ons projekteer egter ook die lirieke vir almal om saam te sing.

KAARTJIES: Volwassenes: R80 / Kinders: R50

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za
012-460-6033

Homecoming Africa @ Voortrekker Monument
Sep 28 @ 5:00 pm – 11:45 pm

HomeComing Africa is the second event year of an eventing revolution set to take the continent by storm. A celebration of African music, culture and lifestyle as well as the building of the cultural bridge between international artists and local support bases.

HCA is really an opportunity for Homecoming Events to break down the walls of what we deem to be a success and encouraging others in similar positions as us to do the same. Its us not saying ‘ Africa is the future” as lip service but actually investing in proving that it is its about breaking the stereotypes about black people and entertaining the dream that will build a fresh bridge with the international community.

Pretoria – The City of Tshwane’s much loved Homecoming Africa festival is back!
Homecoming Events said they were gearing up to provide the ultimate in music, service and comedy during the three-day festival headlined by Kwesta, A-Reece, Boity, Moozlie, Zakes Bantwini, Da Capo and many more.
 
The festival will again make the Voortrekker Monument its home for three days, from  September 26 to 28.
Katlego Malatji, managing director for Homecoming Events said attendees can expect an experience out of the ordinary. 
 
“Homecoming Africa will launch their community service initiative that is aimed at giving back on the first day of the festival. 
 
“This festival will bring a significant shift in the way we view events, social responsibilities and music on the continent, it is the start of something very special.
 
“The second day will consist of a comedy night where local comedians will get an opportunity to showcase the growing comedic community in Pretoria and the rest of South Africa,” Malatji said.
 
Music lovers will be spoilt for choice from Hip Hop, House, to Kwaito genres on the last day. 
 
Tickets range from R150 to R650.

A file picture of last year’s Homecoming Africa festival. Picture: Supplied

WIENER BLUT JOHANN STRAUSS II @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

 

 

presents

WIENER BLUT

Saturday 28 September 18:00
Sunday 29 September 15:00

Johann Strauss II / Adolf Müller II (Music)
Victor Léon & Leo Stein (Libretto)

a semi staged Salon version with costumes and projections accompanied by the Brooklyn Theatre Salon Ensemble

Prince Ypsheim-Gindelbach (Prime Minister)
Douwe Bijkersma (baritone)

Balduin Count Zedlau (Count)
Righard Linde, from Austria

Gabriele (Countess)
Teresa de Wit (mezzo)

Demoiselle Franziska Cagliari (Franzi)
Ilze Coetzee (soprano)

Pepi Pleininger
Marina Botha Spies (soprano)

Josef
Tinus Spies (tenor)

Johann Strauss (narrator)
Chirstopher Vale

Salon Music has, over the past 25 years, staged Salon Versions of nine Viennese operettas and many more Operetta Galas.

Johann Strauss ii is always a popular choice for entertaining theatrical fare and musical enjoyment on every level. The farcical libretto of Wiener Blut is typical of romantic operettas and happens to be one of Strauss’ many works in this genre which has survived the stringent test of time.

The magical vocal score, based on Viennese waltzes, Polkas and Marches permeating the deligthful score of Wiener Blut, bubbles forth to please and soothe the senses.

This year’s presentation of Wiener Blut will be semi-staged with projections. It is a typical Salon Music production, which is shortened and features an actor, portraying the role of Johann Strauss, who narrates the storyline.

Ticket sales:

Saturday 28 September 18:00
Sunday 29 September 15:00

Block A (Adult) – R300
Block A (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R270
Block B (Adult) – R250
Block B (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R200

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

HAZEL FOOD MARKET @ Greenlyn Village
Sep 28 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

At Hazel Food Market we continue to provide you with the best food products Pretoria has to offer and aim to always offer exciting new tastes to make your Saturday mornings something to look forward to.

 

The Parlotones – Unplugged (ish) @ Atterbury Teater
Sep 28 @ 8:00 pm – Sep 29 @ 9:30 pm

The Parlotones – Unplugged (ish)

Sat. 28 Sep. 20:00
Sun. 29 Sep. 15:00

THE UNPLUGGED(ish) TOUR by THE PARLOTONES that will see us perform a special intimate show at the Atterbury Theatre, Pretoria in support of the release of The Parlotones ‘SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW, SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE’ Unplugged(ish) album.

Recorded at High Seas Studios in Johannesburg, the recording is rich with favourites from the band’s back catalogue, as well as a stunning take of select singles off the recently released SAMA nominated album CHINA.

Join The Parlotones for a special evening and experience something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue as they take you on a journey through songs that spans 21 years.

Bookings via www.itickets.co.za

Sep
29
Sun
EntreQuatre. Classical Guitar Quartet from Spain @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 29 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

EntreQuatre
Classical Guitar Quartet from Spain
Sunday 29 September 11:00 – 13:00

This concert is made possible by the kind support offered by Gobierno del Principado de Asturias, INAEM, 
The Embassy of Spain in South-Africa in collaboration with Brooklyn Theatre and the Gauteng International Arts Festival. 

AROUND THE WORLD IN 4 GUITARS

This is a unique trip around the world, recalling the most important stopovers of the Magellan expedition.

Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, ThePhilippines and Indonesia are the countries that provide
the music to this journey; music that reflects the culture of those lands, and what we have received from them that lasts until our
days.

The program is composed by music created or versioned for the guitar quartet EntreQuatre,
and both selected from the 77 works released in these 35years of
uninterrupted activity, or commissioned especially for this programme.

Several contemporary Spanish works, a Fado, a Brazilian music that pays tribute
to an Amazonian tribe, a rebellious Uruguayan work, two cardinal points of an
Argentine melody, three traditional Filipino dances and bucolic music of
Sulawesi, one of the Spice Islands. All of them configure this program of
multiple faces and sounds so diverse that they end up having an aesthetic unity.

35 YEARS

35 years of experience that have led to the presentation of our quartet in prestigious international venues,
such as the Carnegie Hall in New York, or the Latin Grammy’s nomination in 2009.

AROUND THE WORLD IN 4 GUITARS

PROGRAMME

Flores Chaviano (Cuba/España1946)
Entrequatre(1984)

Sergio Assad (Brasil1952)
Uarekena(1994)

JavierBlanco (Asturias1977)
MedinaFiAssahab(2009)
Laciudadenlasnubes

LeonardoSánchez (Argentina1966)
Itinerario(suiteArgentina)(2003)
Norte (huayno)
Sur(milonga)

PashaUngu (Indonesia)
SampesuvuRoa*
Versión JavierVázquez (2019)

Tradicional Filipinas
3 danzas tradicionales* VersiónFloresChaviano (2019)

PedroPinhal / JoanaAmendoeira (Portugal)
Lisboa amor e saudade (2017)
Versión Flores Chaviano

Migueldel Águila (Uruguay1957)
Presto(2000)

Links:
htp:/www.entrequatre.es

Entrequatre,FloresChaviano: htps:/www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NvP_ctp5F8

Presto,MigueldelÁlguila: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBUE22euvTk 

AlworksversionedorwritenforEntreQuatre *WorldPremiere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bookings: www.brooklyntheatre.co.za (012) 460 6033

Brooklyn Theatre is proud to feature yet another top class European ensemble of musicians on our stage. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdQ2NZyT3J0

In 2009, when EntreQuatre was celebrating it’s 25th anniversary, it received one of it’s most important recognitions by being nominated to Latin Grammy Awards with the pice “4 Asimetrías”, written by Orlando Jacinto García and performed by the quartet.

In May 2017 EntreQuatre performed in the prestigious Prague Spring 72 International Music Festival filling up the hole Dvořák’s concert room with more tan 1000 people and having an undeniable success.
In 2016, on it’s 30th anniversary, Entrequatre achived an overwhelming victory performing the premiere of “Second Concert for 4 guitars and Orchestra” composed by Flores Chaviano and with the collaboration of the Symphonic Orchestra of the Principality of Asturias, conducted by Oliver Díaz.

In 1984 four Asturian guitarrists began working together as a group never suspecting that over the years they would become one of the most original and well established chamber ensembles in the field of contemporary music in Spain. In consequence, during this period, Entrequatre has inspired the creation of new works for four guitars, having premièred more than forty. Their autors are: Miguel del Aguila, Moisés Arnáiz, Imanol Bageneta, Jose Luis Barroso, Javier Blanco, Gustavo Becerra-Schmit, Alejandro Cardona, Enrico Chapela, Flores Chaviano, Fernando Colás, Carlos Cruz de Castro, Francisco Cuenca, María Escribano, Gabriel Fdez. Álvez, Orlando J. García, Tomás Garrido, Jose Mª García Laborda, Radamés Gnatalli, Agustín González Acilu, Rey Guerra, Fredrick Kaufman, Jose Manuel Lorenzo, Marisa Manchado, Jonatas Manzolli, Juan Méndez, Emiliano Pardo, Paquito D’Rivera, Leonardo Sánchez, Raúl do Valle.

Entrequatre has made tours of Europe, the United Estates, South America, South Africa and India. It is fitting to point out their presence at the following festivals: I Andrés Segovia In Memoriam, organised by the Sociedad General de Autores y Editores, X Rothemburg Guitar Festival (Germany), Aveiro Guitar Festival (Portugal), VI Salamanca Festival of Contemporary Music, XIII International Festival of Contemporary Music in Alicante, FIU Music Festival in Miami (1999), Santander International Festival and Donostia Music Fortnight.

In November 1989 they performed in the National Museum in Warsaw. In January 1992 they premièred Critalería Barroca by Carlos Cruz de Castro and ¿6×4? 24 by Marisa Manchado in the Reina Sofía National Museum and Art Centre in Madrid. In February 1995 they gave the first performance of Voyage, by María Escribano, in Brussels, and of Aquí lejos y Hace tiempo, by Leonardo Sánchez, in Paris. In January 1997 they oponed a guitar quartet cycle in the Juan March Foundation, with the premières of Sonata de Temple by García Laborda and Quartet nº1 by Radamés Gnatalli. In December 1998 they opened the concert season of the Miami Guitar Society with a recital in which they gave the world première of Concierto para cuatro guitarras «A García Lorca in memoriam» by Gabriel Fernández Álvez. In October 1999 they performed 4 Asimetrías by Orlando J. García and Catalan Concertante by Fredrick Kaufman in Auditorio Príncipe Felipe in Oviedo. In November 1999 they made their second tour of the USA, including performances in towns such as Washington, UNO headquarters in New York, Chicago and Miami.

Their collaboration with other groups began in 1989, when together with the Príncipe de Asturias Choir, they gave the first performance of Flores Chaviano’s Son de Negros en Cuba, for choir, narrator, small percussion group and guitar quartet, based on a text by García Lorca, during a tour of Germany and Poland. In February 1994 they premièred, accompanied by the Principality of Asturias Symphony Orchestra (O.S.P.A), another composition by Flores Chaviano, Concierto para Cuatro Guitarras y Orquesta, commissioned by the Centro para la Difusión de la Música Contemporánea. With the same orchestra, in December 1997 they performed Concierto Ibérico for four guitars and orchestra by F. Moreno-Torroba, and recorded Concierto para cuatro guitarras by Rodrigo for NAXOS in 2000.

Ticket sales:

Sunday 29 September 11:00 – 13:00

Block A (Adult) – R250
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R150

Block B (Adult) – R140
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R100

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

WIENER BLUT JOHANN STRAUSS II @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 29 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

 

 

presents

WIENER BLUT

Saturday 28 September 18:00
Sunday 29 September 15:00

Johann Strauss II / Adolf Müller II (Music)
Victor Léon & Leo Stein (Libretto)

a semi staged Salon version with costumes and projections accompanied by the Brooklyn Theatre Salon Ensemble

Prince Ypsheim-Gindelbach (Prime Minister)
Douwe Bijkersma (baritone)

Balduin Count Zedlau (Count)
Righard Linde

Gabriele (Countess)
Teresa de Wit (mezzo)

Demoiselle Franziska Cagliari (Franzi)
Ilze Coetzee (soprano)

Pepi Pleininger
Marina Botha Spies (soprano)

Josef
Tinus Spies (tenor)

Johann Strauss (narrator)
Chirstopher Vale

Salon Music has, over the past 25 years, staged Salon Versions of nine Viennese operettas and many more Operetta Galas.

Johann Strauss ii is always a popular choice for entertaining theatrical fare and musical enjoyment on every level. The farcical libretto of Wiener Blut is typical of romantic operettas and happens to be one of Strauss’ many works in this genre which has survived the stringent test of time.

The magical vocal score, based on Viennese waltzes, Polkas and Marches permeating the deligthful score of Wiener Blut, bubbles forth to please and soothe the senses.

This year’s presentation of Wiener Blut will be semi-staged with projections. It is a typical Salon Music production, which is shortened and features an actor, portraying the role of Johann Strauss, who narrates the storyline.

Ticket sales:

Saturday 28 September 18:00
Sunday 29 September 15:00

Block A (Adult) – R300
Block A (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R270
Block B (Adult) – R250
Block B (Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R200

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

The Parlotones – Unplugged (ish) @ Atterbury Teater
Sep 29 @ 3:30 pm – 7:30 pm

The Parlotones – Unplugged (ish)

Sat. 28 Sep. 19:00
Sun. 29 Sep. 15:30

THE UNPLUGGED(ish) TOUR by THE PARLOTONES that will see us perform a special intimate show at the Atterbury Theatre, Pretoria in support of the release of The Parlotones ‘SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW, SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE’ Unplugged(ish) album.

Recorded at High Seas Studios in Johannesburg, the recording is rich with favourites from the band’s back catalogue, as well as a stunning take of select singles off the recently released SAMA nominated album CHINA.

Join The Parlotones for a special evening and experience something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue as they take you on a journey through songs that spans 21 years.

The Tim Kliphuis Trio “BRANDENBURG” @ Brooklyn Theatre
Sep 29 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Tim Kliphuis Trio
“BRANDENBURG”

Sunday 29 September 19:00

Award-winning Dutch violinist Tim Kliphuis and his Trio return to South Africa to present their new CD with the music of J.S. Bach re-imagined: “Brandenburg!”
Playing a mixture of classical, gypsy jazz and folk, the Tim Kliphuis Trio present a dazzling show with moments of sheer beauty. Besides Bach, expect to hear Django Reinhardt, Gabriel Fauré and Richard Strauss.

“Superb: a thoughtful, provocative meeting of minds” – Sunday Times
“Freewheeling in an improvisatory style” – The Guardian
“Playfully inventive and technically brilliant” – The Scotsman

with:
Tim Kliphuis – violin
Nigel Clark – guitar
Roy Percy – double bass

Ticket sales:

Sunday 29 September 19:00
Block A (Adult) – R260
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R210

Block B (Adult) – R200
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R160

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

Tim Kliphuis has been hailed as a contemporary improvising “Paganini”. He has shared the stage with Richard Galliano, Frankie Gavin, Les Paul and many gypsy jazz groups including The Rosenberg Trio. He has a busy international schedule including work with The Hague Philharmonic, is an in-demand educator at competitions, masterclasses and conservatoires and is the author of best-selling book “Gypsy Jazz Violin”.

Nigel Clark is an awe-inspiring guitar virtuoso with a unique sound, and has worked with the biggest names in jazz, folk and rock including Gloria Gaynor, Moya Brennan, Jan Akkerman, Philip Catherine, Carla Bley, Steve Swallow and Scottish hit band Hue and Cry. He toured the Far East with legendary jazz singer Carol Kidd and has played the music of Django Reinhardt all his life.

Roy Percy’s bass sound is rooted in New Orleans and Jump-Jive, bringing the Trio raw street rhythms and infectious grooves. He has worked with top Americans Duke Heitger, Marty Grosz, Bob Barnard and Evan Christopher. His unique bass slapping techniques, unrivalled in Europe, and his subtle dynamic feel make for a great range of emotions.

Official website: www.timkliphuis.com

Oct
1
Tue
BE A BETTER DOG @ SA State Theatre
Oct 1 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

THE SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH AFRICAN TREE PRODUCTIONS

Brings You
BE A BETTER DOG

Pretoria 
320 Pretorius Street
Momentum Theatre

Date: 01-06 October 2019

    Written By:Makhubalo Ikaneng
    Directed and performed By:Seiphemo Motswiri

The South African State Theatre in association with African Tree Productions brings you a one man show titled “BE A BETTER DOG”. The show tells a tale of Dog’s life while at the same time we get to see the world we live in through the eyes of a dog. This one man play raises questions that challenge humans to self introspect. The play is an entire re-enactment of the dog’s solid life with commentary on its several social issues as it interacted with its various owners.  

The play uses humour and light commentary to speak to otherwise sensitive issues of class, care and abandonment as applied and taken up by the human being in an attempt to tackle life challenges. As a dog he grapples with questions such as to what extent is he a happy animal, and to what extent is he a traumatized orphan of human caused condition? Is any of it his own making and what power did he as dog have to change the situation? These are poignant questions that are relevant to a human world that is at crossroads with questions of destructive violence, corruption, injustice, racial discrimination, lack of care to the planet in and its inhabitants in general. In life we strive to be better human beings, but what does it mean to be better? And what does it take to be better? The show was part of United Solo festival 2018 in New York where it received 5 Star review on Solo Critics’ Choice. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, directed and performed by Seiphemo Motswiri. Be A Better Dog opens at Sibusiso Queenana Theatre stage at State Theatre on 1 October 2019. 

Tickets can be purchased via WebTickets https://www.webtickets.co.za/mobi/event.aspx?itemid=1489181694

 

By Kia Standard

What makes a better dog? Is it loyalty, integrity, or courage? “Be A Better Dog” chronicles the life of a lovable canine that grows up in a small town outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, this tale is told in the great tradition of oldfashioned storytelling. Actor Seiphemo Motswiri plays the lovable pup. Dressed in a tan tshirt, armygreen sweatpants, and white Converse sneakers, he leaps onto the stage, panting enthusiastically.

And the audience is immediately hooked.
 
The dog’s mother Sophie gets pregnant by a police guard dog, and after she has her litter, each puppy is promptly given away to various people in the town. The dog’s first owner Timbe lives next door to the owner of the dog’s mother; however, he is never allowed to see her and barks at her through a fence. Timbe names his new puppy Danger, and ties him to a pole in the backyard. Timbe was once a high roller in Johannesburg, surrounded by wealth and women.

After losing his fortune, he bitterly returns to the town, and takes out his aggression on the dog. When Timbe wins the lottery and moves to the suburbs, he takes Danger with him. Danger is still chained to a pole, but in nicer surroundings. Timbe squanders his fortune within three months, and after his house and belongings are repossessed, the dog is taken away from him.
 
Danger’s new owner treats him better. His name is Ron Pete and he has a scruffy beard.

He renames the dog Condo. Ron Pete reads the newspaper and complains about “the white genocide” plaguing South Africa. Ron Pete’s biggest fear is that black people will move into his neighbourhood. One day a black family moves nearby, and the shock causes Ron Pete to have a heart attack. He leaves Condo to his son Simon and daughterinlaw Linda in his will.
 
Simon and Linda spoil Condo and shower him with love and presents.

He gets his own room, his own bowl, and more toys than he knows what to do with. However, when Simon is at work, Linda has a daily visitor named Uncle. Uncle is not fond of Condo. He’s nice when Linda is around, but mean to the dog whenever she leaves the room. A few months later, Linda finds out she is pregnant. Condo is unexpectedly removed from his plush surroundings, and Simon chains him to a pole in the backyard. The rain is intense and Condo becomes feverish.

He is taken to a vet, who gives him a shot from a sharp needle. When he wakes up he finds himself alone on the side of a busy highway.
 
He wanders for a few days and follows a few men who are walking to work. One man complains that their employers treat them “no better than a dog.” A dog himself, Condo wonders what that statement means. The men are mine workers, and a security guard named Solomon takes a liking to Condo and adopts him.

Solomon was once a mine worker but after an injury, his managers gave him a job at the gate. A few days later there is a strike and Solomon and Condo are caught in the middle. The other employees are angry because Solomon continues to work. There is a raid on the offices and Condo tries his best to protect his owner. He promises to “be a better dog.”
 
Seiphemo Motswiri’s acting is engaging.

He physicalizes the dog with rounded paw hands, leaps of enthusiasm, and a laughing bark. He also seamlessly transitions between each of the human characters’ vocal timbres, postures, and kinetic movements. There were times when I wanted to dance to the rhythm of the show’s South African beats and sing along with him.

To sum up his performance in one word: Joyous!
 
“Be a Better Dog” presents social commentary not only reflecting how human beings treat their animals, but also how human beings treat each other. It teaches us to be a better friend, a better partner, and a better citizen. Just “be a better dog.”

“BE A BETTER DOG”
Performed by Seiphemo Motswiri
Nov. 16 at 7:30pm
Writer: Makhubalo Ikaneng
Stage Manager: Ikobeng Moatlhodi
Show Image by Sello Maepa, courtesy of the production
United Solo 2018
Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
New York City
Review link By Alex News
Olive Tree Theatre

http://alexnews.co.za/86549/manala35theatre/#.WHzHl_IPlSA.gmail

Mixed Messages
Be a Better Dog was showcased from 18 to 21 August and displayed the raw, imaginative and spellbinding creativity of the sole actor, Alex Seiphemo. He exposes the deep, intricate, entrapping and confusing social challenges deriving from the lack of a life script.

This through the eyes of a dog who acts in such a way to depict a human growing through confusing signals about the good and the bad in life within the family, immediate and distant community of parents, siblings and friends.
Audiences are led through a journey of uncertain love, inconsistent family unity and support, crime, race and class conflict, poverty and affluence which all fail to clarify the essence of life in a society of the have and the have-nots, the poor and the rich, black and white, female and male all struggling for the true meaning of life.
Be a Better Dog also featured at this year’s annual, world-renowned Grahamstown Theatre Festival and may be repeated at Olive Tree Theatre later this year.
Be a Better Dog [27 November 2016]
Wits Theatre SoSolo Festival
STANLEY-CARL DU-PONT

Seiphemo Motswiri in “Be a Better Dog” at the So Solo Theatre Festval at Wits Theatre gave a truly outstanding performance, well worth seeing more than once!

Oct
2
Wed
Trees are Life Prize-giving GALA concert with Marimbas @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 2 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm


Trees are Life Prize-giving GALA concert with Marimbas
2 October 14:30  Brooklyn Theatre

The Goede Hoop Prestige Band from Reiger Park was started in 2014 and the Dominican School for the Deaf in Hammanskraal was started in 2017 as part of Education Africa’s Marimba Hubs Project. Education Africa has 17 Marimba Hubs in and around Gauteng and has over 1000 participants in its programme.

The Goede Hoop Prestige Band  has toured the UK in 2016 where they wowed the crowds wherever they performed.

The Dominican Band is the first marimba band in the world consisting entirely of deaf children.

In August 2018 both these bands performed at the Germiston Theatre in a concert celebrating people with disabilities.  They had the honour of performing with internationally acclaimed Ladysmith Black Mambazo in a rendition of their famous hit song: HOMELESS.

Both bands have competed at the Education Africa International Marimba and Steelpan Festival where they have impressed the crowds and have won several awards.  They have also performed on stage with 180 performers at the annual Sounds of Celebration concerts held at the Theatre of Marcellus at Emperor’s Palace.

Their programme will include some pieces where they will be playing together as a joint band and some pieces where they will perform on their own.

The will be playing some classical repertoire by Vivaldi, Handel and Beethoven, some traditional African music and some popular pieces.

#marimba #trees #bome

Xplore Tshwane Meet South Africa Visit Gauteng Tshwane Social Events Visit Tshwane – Pretoria and greater Tshwane city and surrounds South AfricaGauteng City of Tshwane | Official (Page) Brooklyn Theatre Pretoria.co.zaShowMe Pretoria marimba Department of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesSappi Aurecon

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

www.brooklyntheatre.co.za

“FENCE” Contemporary Dance Theatre choreographer Kateryna Aloshyna, Ukraine @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Aloshyna Kateryna. Ukraine. Contemporary Dance Theatre
Wednesday 2 October 19:00 – 20:00

Borders do not exist in our lives, neither for love, nor deeds. People invent barriers for themselves, which means they can be destroyed.

Tickets available via www.itickets.co.za
https://itickets.co.za/events/431683

Contemporary dance performance “Fence” is being created in collaboration with international choreographer Kateryna Aloshyna (Ukraine), Gauteng International Festival and the Brooklyn Theatre and is based on the book “The multicoloured management” by Valeriy Pekar which considers the classifications of the dominance of value systems and paradigms of thinking by people, within the different social structures.

Dance performance indicates 8 paradigms of thinking through the colours:
Beige – world of instincts;
Purple – world of magic;
Red – world of power;
Blue – world of rules;
Orange – world of strategy;
Green – world of harmony;
Yellow – world-kaleidoscope;
Turquoise – world-organism.

Dance performances demonstrating the evolution of the human thinking, gives the audience a key for understanding each other, different types of values and cultures, also, reflection about “Why we use these fences in our lives (a fence as a way to hide; a fence as a means of self-defence; a fence as a barrier or block; a fence as a means to feel safe; a fence as a possibility; a fence as art; a fence as a finish)”, ”Why people in the same time live in different worlds?”, “Who decides about what frames we put themselves in and what colours we draw our lives?”

I moved to Centurion in August 2018 and as an art person started finding what is interesting here about art. One of the first I visited Gauting International Festival. I am convinced that format of a festival can open more edges of any art dance than, for instance, competitions/championships. Festival is a good opportunity to meet new choreographers and their choreography; to see what trends the dance world have, what actual subjects are as for choreographers, as for dancers.

Invite you to join our contemporary performance which demonstrate the evolution of the human thinking, gives audience a key for understanding each other, different types of values and cultures, also, reflection about “Why we use fence in our life?”, ”Why people in the same time live in different worlds?”, “Who decides about what frames we put themselves in and what colours we draw our lives?”
Looking forward to see you and speak dance.

BE A BETTER DOG @ SA State Theatre
Oct 2 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

THE SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH AFRICAN TREE PRODUCTIONS

Brings You
BE A BETTER DOG

Pretoria 
320 Pretorius Street
Momentum Theatre

Date: 01-06 October 2019

    Written By:Makhubalo Ikaneng
    Directed and performed By:Seiphemo Motswiri

The South African State Theatre in association with African Tree Productions brings you a one man show titled “BE A BETTER DOG”. The show tells a tale of Dog’s life while at the same time we get to see the world we live in through the eyes of a dog. This one man play raises questions that challenge humans to self introspect. The play is an entire re-enactment of the dog’s solid life with commentary on its several social issues as it interacted with its various owners.  

The play uses humour and light commentary to speak to otherwise sensitive issues of class, care and abandonment as applied and taken up by the human being in an attempt to tackle life challenges. As a dog he grapples with questions such as to what extent is he a happy animal, and to what extent is he a traumatized orphan of human caused condition? Is any of it his own making and what power did he as dog have to change the situation? These are poignant questions that are relevant to a human world that is at crossroads with questions of destructive violence, corruption, injustice, racial discrimination, lack of care to the planet in and its inhabitants in general. In life we strive to be better human beings, but what does it mean to be better? And what does it take to be better? The show was part of United Solo festival 2018 in New York where it received 5 Star review on Solo Critics’ Choice. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, directed and performed by Seiphemo Motswiri. Be A Better Dog opens at Sibusiso Queenana Theatre stage at State Theatre on 1 October 2019. 

Tickets can be purchased via WebTickets https://www.webtickets.co.za/mobi/event.aspx?itemid=1489181694

 

By Kia Standard

What makes a better dog? Is it loyalty, integrity, or courage? “Be A Better Dog” chronicles the life of a lovable canine that grows up in a small town outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, this tale is told in the great tradition of oldfashioned storytelling. Actor Seiphemo Motswiri plays the lovable pup. Dressed in a tan tshirt, armygreen sweatpants, and white Converse sneakers, he leaps onto the stage, panting enthusiastically.

And the audience is immediately hooked.
 
The dog’s mother Sophie gets pregnant by a police guard dog, and after she has her litter, each puppy is promptly given away to various people in the town. The dog’s first owner Timbe lives next door to the owner of the dog’s mother; however, he is never allowed to see her and barks at her through a fence. Timbe names his new puppy Danger, and ties him to a pole in the backyard. Timbe was once a high roller in Johannesburg, surrounded by wealth and women.

After losing his fortune, he bitterly returns to the town, and takes out his aggression on the dog. When Timbe wins the lottery and moves to the suburbs, he takes Danger with him. Danger is still chained to a pole, but in nicer surroundings. Timbe squanders his fortune within three months, and after his house and belongings are repossessed, the dog is taken away from him.
 
Danger’s new owner treats him better. His name is Ron Pete and he has a scruffy beard.

He renames the dog Condo. Ron Pete reads the newspaper and complains about “the white genocide” plaguing South Africa. Ron Pete’s biggest fear is that black people will move into his neighbourhood. One day a black family moves nearby, and the shock causes Ron Pete to have a heart attack. He leaves Condo to his son Simon and daughterinlaw Linda in his will.
 
Simon and Linda spoil Condo and shower him with love and presents.

He gets his own room, his own bowl, and more toys than he knows what to do with. However, when Simon is at work, Linda has a daily visitor named Uncle. Uncle is not fond of Condo. He’s nice when Linda is around, but mean to the dog whenever she leaves the room. A few months later, Linda finds out she is pregnant. Condo is unexpectedly removed from his plush surroundings, and Simon chains him to a pole in the backyard. The rain is intense and Condo becomes feverish.

He is taken to a vet, who gives him a shot from a sharp needle. When he wakes up he finds himself alone on the side of a busy highway.
 
He wanders for a few days and follows a few men who are walking to work. One man complains that their employers treat them “no better than a dog.” A dog himself, Condo wonders what that statement means. The men are mine workers, and a security guard named Solomon takes a liking to Condo and adopts him.

Solomon was once a mine worker but after an injury, his managers gave him a job at the gate. A few days later there is a strike and Solomon and Condo are caught in the middle. The other employees are angry because Solomon continues to work. There is a raid on the offices and Condo tries his best to protect his owner. He promises to “be a better dog.”
 
Seiphemo Motswiri’s acting is engaging.

He physicalizes the dog with rounded paw hands, leaps of enthusiasm, and a laughing bark. He also seamlessly transitions between each of the human characters’ vocal timbres, postures, and kinetic movements. There were times when I wanted to dance to the rhythm of the show’s South African beats and sing along with him.

To sum up his performance in one word: Joyous!
 
“Be a Better Dog” presents social commentary not only reflecting how human beings treat their animals, but also how human beings treat each other. It teaches us to be a better friend, a better partner, and a better citizen. Just “be a better dog.”

“BE A BETTER DOG”
Performed by Seiphemo Motswiri
Nov. 16 at 7:30pm
Writer: Makhubalo Ikaneng
Stage Manager: Ikobeng Moatlhodi
Show Image by Sello Maepa, courtesy of the production
United Solo 2018
Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
New York City
Review link By Alex News
Olive Tree Theatre

http://alexnews.co.za/86549/manala35theatre/#.WHzHl_IPlSA.gmail

Mixed Messages
Be a Better Dog was showcased from 18 to 21 August and displayed the raw, imaginative and spellbinding creativity of the sole actor, Alex Seiphemo. He exposes the deep, intricate, entrapping and confusing social challenges deriving from the lack of a life script.

This through the eyes of a dog who acts in such a way to depict a human growing through confusing signals about the good and the bad in life within the family, immediate and distant community of parents, siblings and friends.
Audiences are led through a journey of uncertain love, inconsistent family unity and support, crime, race and class conflict, poverty and affluence which all fail to clarify the essence of life in a society of the have and the have-nots, the poor and the rich, black and white, female and male all struggling for the true meaning of life.
Be a Better Dog also featured at this year’s annual, world-renowned Grahamstown Theatre Festival and may be repeated at Olive Tree Theatre later this year.
Be a Better Dog [27 November 2016]
Wits Theatre SoSolo Festival
STANLEY-CARL DU-PONT

Seiphemo Motswiri in “Be a Better Dog” at the So Solo Theatre Festval at Wits Theatre gave a truly outstanding performance, well worth seeing more than once!

Helena Hettema: The divine Divas, the magical Musicals and great instrumental classics @ Pierneefteater
Oct 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm


The divine Divas, the magical Musicals and great instrumental classics

Helena Hettema
Klavier:  Elsa Strating

Woensdag 2 Oktober  19h00

R140 volwassenes / R130 kinders en pensioenarisse

012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

55 min

Pouse:  Nee

Helena Hettema sings timeless songs from great musicals such as Evita, Jesus Christ Superstar, Cabaret and A little night music.  The show also features songs of the great Divas – Bette Midler, Della Reese, Judy Garland, Marlene Diettrich and Vera Lynne.  The pianist Elsa Strating will play instrumental favourites such as Casta Diva and the theme from Scent of a woman.

Oct
3
Thu
First Thursdays at 012 Central @ 012 Central
Oct 3 @ 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

First Thursdays celebrates anything to do with music and art. Join us at 012central (Pretoria’s cultural hub) where multiple restaurants and studios will have pop up exhibitions and live music.

3 October 19:00 – 23:00
Address: 367 Helen Jospeh Street, Pretoria Central
Entrance: Free

BE A BETTER DOG @ SA State Theatre
Oct 3 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

THE SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH AFRICAN TREE PRODUCTIONS

Brings You
BE A BETTER DOG

Pretoria 
320 Pretorius Street
Momentum Theatre

Date: 01-06 October 2019

    Written By:Makhubalo Ikaneng
    Directed and performed By:Seiphemo Motswiri

The South African State Theatre in association with African Tree Productions brings you a one man show titled “BE A BETTER DOG”. The show tells a tale of Dog’s life while at the same time we get to see the world we live in through the eyes of a dog. This one man play raises questions that challenge humans to self introspect. The play is an entire re-enactment of the dog’s solid life with commentary on its several social issues as it interacted with its various owners.  

The play uses humour and light commentary to speak to otherwise sensitive issues of class, care and abandonment as applied and taken up by the human being in an attempt to tackle life challenges. As a dog he grapples with questions such as to what extent is he a happy animal, and to what extent is he a traumatized orphan of human caused condition? Is any of it his own making and what power did he as dog have to change the situation? These are poignant questions that are relevant to a human world that is at crossroads with questions of destructive violence, corruption, injustice, racial discrimination, lack of care to the planet in and its inhabitants in general. In life we strive to be better human beings, but what does it mean to be better? And what does it take to be better? The show was part of United Solo festival 2018 in New York where it received 5 Star review on Solo Critics’ Choice. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, directed and performed by Seiphemo Motswiri. Be A Better Dog opens at Sibusiso Queenana Theatre stage at State Theatre on 1 October 2019. 

Tickets can be purchased via WebTickets https://www.webtickets.co.za/mobi/event.aspx?itemid=1489181694

 

By Kia Standard

What makes a better dog? Is it loyalty, integrity, or courage? “Be A Better Dog” chronicles the life of a lovable canine that grows up in a small town outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, this tale is told in the great tradition of oldfashioned storytelling. Actor Seiphemo Motswiri plays the lovable pup. Dressed in a tan tshirt, armygreen sweatpants, and white Converse sneakers, he leaps onto the stage, panting enthusiastically.

And the audience is immediately hooked.
 
The dog’s mother Sophie gets pregnant by a police guard dog, and after she has her litter, each puppy is promptly given away to various people in the town. The dog’s first owner Timbe lives next door to the owner of the dog’s mother; however, he is never allowed to see her and barks at her through a fence. Timbe names his new puppy Danger, and ties him to a pole in the backyard. Timbe was once a high roller in Johannesburg, surrounded by wealth and women.

After losing his fortune, he bitterly returns to the town, and takes out his aggression on the dog. When Timbe wins the lottery and moves to the suburbs, he takes Danger with him. Danger is still chained to a pole, but in nicer surroundings. Timbe squanders his fortune within three months, and after his house and belongings are repossessed, the dog is taken away from him.
 
Danger’s new owner treats him better. His name is Ron Pete and he has a scruffy beard.

He renames the dog Condo. Ron Pete reads the newspaper and complains about “the white genocide” plaguing South Africa. Ron Pete’s biggest fear is that black people will move into his neighbourhood. One day a black family moves nearby, and the shock causes Ron Pete to have a heart attack. He leaves Condo to his son Simon and daughterinlaw Linda in his will.
 
Simon and Linda spoil Condo and shower him with love and presents.

He gets his own room, his own bowl, and more toys than he knows what to do with. However, when Simon is at work, Linda has a daily visitor named Uncle. Uncle is not fond of Condo. He’s nice when Linda is around, but mean to the dog whenever she leaves the room. A few months later, Linda finds out she is pregnant. Condo is unexpectedly removed from his plush surroundings, and Simon chains him to a pole in the backyard. The rain is intense and Condo becomes feverish.

He is taken to a vet, who gives him a shot from a sharp needle. When he wakes up he finds himself alone on the side of a busy highway.
 
He wanders for a few days and follows a few men who are walking to work. One man complains that their employers treat them “no better than a dog.” A dog himself, Condo wonders what that statement means. The men are mine workers, and a security guard named Solomon takes a liking to Condo and adopts him.

Solomon was once a mine worker but after an injury, his managers gave him a job at the gate. A few days later there is a strike and Solomon and Condo are caught in the middle. The other employees are angry because Solomon continues to work. There is a raid on the offices and Condo tries his best to protect his owner. He promises to “be a better dog.”
 
Seiphemo Motswiri’s acting is engaging.

He physicalizes the dog with rounded paw hands, leaps of enthusiasm, and a laughing bark. He also seamlessly transitions between each of the human characters’ vocal timbres, postures, and kinetic movements. There were times when I wanted to dance to the rhythm of the show’s South African beats and sing along with him.

To sum up his performance in one word: Joyous!
 
“Be a Better Dog” presents social commentary not only reflecting how human beings treat their animals, but also how human beings treat each other. It teaches us to be a better friend, a better partner, and a better citizen. Just “be a better dog.”

“BE A BETTER DOG”
Performed by Seiphemo Motswiri
Nov. 16 at 7:30pm
Writer: Makhubalo Ikaneng
Stage Manager: Ikobeng Moatlhodi
Show Image by Sello Maepa, courtesy of the production
United Solo 2018
Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
New York City
Review link By Alex News
Olive Tree Theatre

http://alexnews.co.za/86549/manala35theatre/#.WHzHl_IPlSA.gmail

Mixed Messages
Be a Better Dog was showcased from 18 to 21 August and displayed the raw, imaginative and spellbinding creativity of the sole actor, Alex Seiphemo. He exposes the deep, intricate, entrapping and confusing social challenges deriving from the lack of a life script.

This through the eyes of a dog who acts in such a way to depict a human growing through confusing signals about the good and the bad in life within the family, immediate and distant community of parents, siblings and friends.
Audiences are led through a journey of uncertain love, inconsistent family unity and support, crime, race and class conflict, poverty and affluence which all fail to clarify the essence of life in a society of the have and the have-nots, the poor and the rich, black and white, female and male all struggling for the true meaning of life.
Be a Better Dog also featured at this year’s annual, world-renowned Grahamstown Theatre Festival and may be repeated at Olive Tree Theatre later this year.
Be a Better Dog [27 November 2016]
Wits Theatre SoSolo Festival
STANLEY-CARL DU-PONT

Seiphemo Motswiri in “Be a Better Dog” at the So Solo Theatre Festval at Wits Theatre gave a truly outstanding performance, well worth seeing more than once!

Korean music group ‘Noreum Machi’ @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 3 @ 7:00 pm – 8:10 pm

Korean music group ‘Noreum Machi’

Thursday 3 October 19:00 – 20:10
Cost: Free & RSVP will be needed

Kim Juhong & Noreum Machi

New Wave Korean Modern & Traditional Music Group.

The Korean  percussion  group Noreum Machi is a highly original musical ensemble.
Since its foundation in 1993, Noreum Machi has been trying to re-discover its traditional music that suits our time by communicating other kinds of music through the basic traditional Korean music without losing its structure. The group takes its name from the term used by Korean minstrels to indicate a combination of skill and timing attained only by the best players.  In competition  “Noreum Machi”  would refer to the player so skilled that no one would dare follow.

Ses Snare @ Pierneefteater
Oct 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Ses Snare

Donderdag 3 Oktober  19h00
R150 volwassenes / R140 kinders en pensioenarisse
012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

80 minute

Pouse:  Nee

Ses Snare se ses sanger/kitaarspelers is elkeen ook ’n solo-kunstenaar in eie reg en lewer telkens ’n topklas vertoning waarin die groep as geheel en elke kunstenaar op sy eie hulle briljante kitaarspeel vermoëns kan ten toonstel

Oct
4
Fri
Chansons Française Competition @ Alliance Française of Pretoria
Oct 4 @ 6:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Chansons Française Competition
Friday, 4th October at 18h30

The Chansons Française Competition is open to everyone, of any age. The goal is to perform a French Language/Francophone song as part of a singing competition that will be hosted at the Alliance Française Pretoria. Participants will compete regionally at the Alliance in Pretoria and then nationally in Johannesburg with others from all over South Africa, where they then stand a chance to win tickets to Paris, France!

To compete is easy, all you have to do is send us a short youtube video (culture@pta.alliance.org.za) of you performing a French song, and if selected, you will get a chance to perform the song live on stage the Friday 4th of October, at which point, if you win the competition, you will be selected to perform nationally in Johannesburg at the Market Theatre.

’n Handvol van Koos se songs Chris Pieterse @ Pierneefteater
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

’n Handvol van Koos se songs

Chris Pieterse

Vrydag 4 Oktober  19h00

R120 per persoon

012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

60 minute

Pouse:  Nee

Chris sing ’n handvol van Koos du Plessis se liedjies in ’n intieme vertoning waar die klem val op Koos se wonderlike woorde en tydlose melodieë.

Chris se eerste Koos-konsert was in die somer van 2009 in die Tarentaalteater in Rustenburg en hierdie wysies en woorde het vir altyd ’n lêplek in sy siel kom kry.  Koos se liedjies bly altyd musiek waarna jy weer en weer wil luister.

MUSICAL THEATRE CONCERT @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm


MUSICAL THEATRE CONCERT
Fri. 4 Oct. 19:00 / Sat. 5 Oct. 11:00
FULL HOUSE THEATRE PRODUCTIONS

After the great success of My Fair Lady in April, theatre-goers will be able to enjoy annual staged productions of some of the most well-known musicals at Brooklyn Theatre in Pretoria.

In order to give audiences a tantalising taste of what’s to come,
FULL HOUSE THEATRE PRODUCTIONS brings you a special concert featuring selections from the Musical Theatre repertoire.

Three of the cast members of My Fair Lady will feature in this concert:

Soprano DEIRDRÉ VAN SCHALKWYK (Mrs Pearce),
Baritone JEAN-PIERRE VERSTER (Freddy Eynsford-Hill)
Baritone CHRISTOPHER VALE (Henry Higgins).
Accompanied by pianist NEIL KROG

Duration: 60 minute concert in total.

Ticket sales:
Fri. 4 Oct. 19:00 / Sat. 5 Oct. 11:00

R150 per person

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

NIGHT TOUR VOORTREKKER MONUMENT @ Voortrekkermonument
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

NIGHT TOUR VOORTREKKER MONUMENT

Enjoy an evening tour of the Voortrekker Monument with a specialist guide or use this opportunity to take photographs. Sherry and snacks on arrival.

Maximum 35 persons, minimum 15 persons
R200 per person (18 years and older, only)

4 October at 18:00

Secure parking
Wheelchair Accessible

RSVP with Thea at thea@vtm.org.za / 012 326 6770 before 15 September

BE A BETTER DOG @ SA State Theatre
Oct 4 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

THE SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH AFRICAN TREE PRODUCTIONS

Brings You
BE A BETTER DOG

Pretoria 
320 Pretorius Street
Momentum Theatre

Date: 01-06 October 2019

    Written By:Makhubalo Ikaneng
    Directed and performed By:Seiphemo Motswiri

The South African State Theatre in association with African Tree Productions brings you a one man show titled “BE A BETTER DOG”. The show tells a tale of Dog’s life while at the same time we get to see the world we live in through the eyes of a dog. This one man play raises questions that challenge humans to self introspect. The play is an entire re-enactment of the dog’s solid life with commentary on its several social issues as it interacted with its various owners.  

The play uses humour and light commentary to speak to otherwise sensitive issues of class, care and abandonment as applied and taken up by the human being in an attempt to tackle life challenges. As a dog he grapples with questions such as to what extent is he a happy animal, and to what extent is he a traumatized orphan of human caused condition? Is any of it his own making and what power did he as dog have to change the situation? These are poignant questions that are relevant to a human world that is at crossroads with questions of destructive violence, corruption, injustice, racial discrimination, lack of care to the planet in and its inhabitants in general. In life we strive to be better human beings, but what does it mean to be better? And what does it take to be better? The show was part of United Solo festival 2018 in New York where it received 5 Star review on Solo Critics’ Choice. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, directed and performed by Seiphemo Motswiri. Be A Better Dog opens at Sibusiso Queenana Theatre stage at State Theatre on 1 October 2019. 

Tickets can be purchased via WebTickets https://www.webtickets.co.za/mobi/event.aspx?itemid=1489181694

 

By Kia Standard

What makes a better dog? Is it loyalty, integrity, or courage? “Be A Better Dog” chronicles the life of a lovable canine that grows up in a small town outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, this tale is told in the great tradition of oldfashioned storytelling. Actor Seiphemo Motswiri plays the lovable pup. Dressed in a tan tshirt, armygreen sweatpants, and white Converse sneakers, he leaps onto the stage, panting enthusiastically.

And the audience is immediately hooked.
 
The dog’s mother Sophie gets pregnant by a police guard dog, and after she has her litter, each puppy is promptly given away to various people in the town. The dog’s first owner Timbe lives next door to the owner of the dog’s mother; however, he is never allowed to see her and barks at her through a fence. Timbe names his new puppy Danger, and ties him to a pole in the backyard. Timbe was once a high roller in Johannesburg, surrounded by wealth and women.

After losing his fortune, he bitterly returns to the town, and takes out his aggression on the dog. When Timbe wins the lottery and moves to the suburbs, he takes Danger with him. Danger is still chained to a pole, but in nicer surroundings. Timbe squanders his fortune within three months, and after his house and belongings are repossessed, the dog is taken away from him.
 
Danger’s new owner treats him better. His name is Ron Pete and he has a scruffy beard.

He renames the dog Condo. Ron Pete reads the newspaper and complains about “the white genocide” plaguing South Africa. Ron Pete’s biggest fear is that black people will move into his neighbourhood. One day a black family moves nearby, and the shock causes Ron Pete to have a heart attack. He leaves Condo to his son Simon and daughterinlaw Linda in his will.
 
Simon and Linda spoil Condo and shower him with love and presents.

He gets his own room, his own bowl, and more toys than he knows what to do with. However, when Simon is at work, Linda has a daily visitor named Uncle. Uncle is not fond of Condo. He’s nice when Linda is around, but mean to the dog whenever she leaves the room. A few months later, Linda finds out she is pregnant. Condo is unexpectedly removed from his plush surroundings, and Simon chains him to a pole in the backyard. The rain is intense and Condo becomes feverish.

He is taken to a vet, who gives him a shot from a sharp needle. When he wakes up he finds himself alone on the side of a busy highway.
 
He wanders for a few days and follows a few men who are walking to work. One man complains that their employers treat them “no better than a dog.” A dog himself, Condo wonders what that statement means. The men are mine workers, and a security guard named Solomon takes a liking to Condo and adopts him.

Solomon was once a mine worker but after an injury, his managers gave him a job at the gate. A few days later there is a strike and Solomon and Condo are caught in the middle. The other employees are angry because Solomon continues to work. There is a raid on the offices and Condo tries his best to protect his owner. He promises to “be a better dog.”
 
Seiphemo Motswiri’s acting is engaging.

He physicalizes the dog with rounded paw hands, leaps of enthusiasm, and a laughing bark. He also seamlessly transitions between each of the human characters’ vocal timbres, postures, and kinetic movements. There were times when I wanted to dance to the rhythm of the show’s South African beats and sing along with him.

To sum up his performance in one word: Joyous!
 
“Be a Better Dog” presents social commentary not only reflecting how human beings treat their animals, but also how human beings treat each other. It teaches us to be a better friend, a better partner, and a better citizen. Just “be a better dog.”

“BE A BETTER DOG”
Performed by Seiphemo Motswiri
Nov. 16 at 7:30pm
Writer: Makhubalo Ikaneng
Stage Manager: Ikobeng Moatlhodi
Show Image by Sello Maepa, courtesy of the production
United Solo 2018
Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
New York City
Review link By Alex News
Olive Tree Theatre

http://alexnews.co.za/86549/manala35theatre/#.WHzHl_IPlSA.gmail

Mixed Messages
Be a Better Dog was showcased from 18 to 21 August and displayed the raw, imaginative and spellbinding creativity of the sole actor, Alex Seiphemo. He exposes the deep, intricate, entrapping and confusing social challenges deriving from the lack of a life script.

This through the eyes of a dog who acts in such a way to depict a human growing through confusing signals about the good and the bad in life within the family, immediate and distant community of parents, siblings and friends.
Audiences are led through a journey of uncertain love, inconsistent family unity and support, crime, race and class conflict, poverty and affluence which all fail to clarify the essence of life in a society of the have and the have-nots, the poor and the rich, black and white, female and male all struggling for the true meaning of life.
Be a Better Dog also featured at this year’s annual, world-renowned Grahamstown Theatre Festival and may be repeated at Olive Tree Theatre later this year.
Be a Better Dog [27 November 2016]
Wits Theatre SoSolo Festival
STANLEY-CARL DU-PONT

Seiphemo Motswiri in “Be a Better Dog” at the So Solo Theatre Festval at Wits Theatre gave a truly outstanding performance, well worth seeing more than once!

Oct
5
Sat
Chamberlain Capital Classic – 2019 @ PHSOB Club
Oct 5 @ 6:00 am – 10:00 am

Saturday 5th October 2019
More Information – Coming Soon !

CHAMBERLAINS CAPITAL

CLASSIC ROAD RACE

This is a scenic and challenging route complete with rolling hills and dales. Most of the race takes place through the suburb of Lynnwood and goes through the ultra-modern HUB Techno Park. The race ends with a fast two kilometre downhill sprint where the MacChamberlain Highlanders Pipe Band brings you in to renditions of ‘Scotland the Brave’.

Start times:

21.1km: 06:00 minimum age: 16 years
10km: 06:00 minimum age: 14 years
5km: 06:15 no minimum age

Cut-off time:

3h30min (all events)

Venue:

Pretoria High School Old Boys Club, Hofmeyr Park
c/o Kings Highway and Queens Crescent, Lynnwood
GPS Coordinates: S25.45.64.4 E28.15.22.8

Race info:

Bert – 082 922 6817
Gerald – 012 356 9500
Rory – 072 023 1177
(During office hour)

Saturday 5th October 2019
More Information – Coming Soon !

ARTS AND CRAFTS AT GREENLYN @ Greenlyn Village Centre
Oct 5 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn – the Rainbow Country at its best!
Written by Prof. Piet Meiring

If you want to know a country and meet its people as they really are, go and find a street market in London, Amsterdam, Berlin or New York.  You will see it all, right before your eyes! It happens in South Africa as well.  Do you want to experience the Rainbow Country and its people, at their most festive and charming, make your way to the Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn, in Pretoria.

Entering the gates on a typical Saturday morning, you find yourself walking into a food market with stalls catering to every conceivable taste and thirst. The real treat, however, is wandering through the arts and crafts market, together with thousands of visitors, local as well as from overseas, discovering the beauty and the colours of South Africa.  Walking up and down the lanes – Pepper Lane, Willow Lane, Acacia Lane or Garden Route Lane – you may browse at more than seventy stalls. And the kids? Mom and Dad may drop them of at Piccolo Lane with its many games and famous water fountain – guaranteed to keep them out of trouble.

A wide variety of crafts from all over South Africa as well as from other African countries is on offer. While admiring the multi-coloured paintings and elegant sculptures, you may be able to talk to the artists themselves, who will gladly discuss their works with you. For the ladies and the girls there are gold jewellery to admire, together with colourful beadwork, copper bracelets, beautifully painted cloth, as well as hand crafted porcelain. And for the men and the boys there is a variety of home-made wooden guns and slings, leather work and exquisite, soft, Nguni-skin carpets. And, if you have to send a letter to your mother in law, paper made from elephant dung may come in handy! For the health-conscious, a number of stalls are devoted to herbs and medicines and creams, for every taste and every ill.

The heart of the market is the Brooklyn Theatre, where local as well as international artists regularly perform. The theatre and its productions are lauded by many as an important contributor the weekly South African musical calendar. Often on a Saturday morning visitors to the market are invited to a Limelight Concert, where budding artists and youth choirs demonstrate their skills during 20-40 minute programmes. The iSalon Music Shop, part of the theatre complex, boasts the largest selection of classical, popular-classical as well as Jazz CDs and DVDs. And if you are searching for sheet music or for instruments, from a simple recorder to a grand piano, this is the address you want.

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn is at the corner of Edison Street and Mc Kenzie Street in Brooklyn, in easy access from the main traffic arteries in Pretoria. The market is wheel chair-friendly and dogs (on leash) are welcome. Market hours are Saturdays from 08:00 till 14:00. Once every quarter an evening market is held as well.

For more information, please contact us by phone 060 976 8113 or by e-mail artsandcraftsatgreenlyn@gmail.com.

MUSICAL THEATRE CONCERT @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm


MUSICAL THEATRE CONCERT
Fri. 4 Oct. 19:00 / Sat. 5 Oct. 11:00
FULL HOUSE THEATRE PRODUCTIONS

After the great success of My Fair Lady in April, theatre-goers will be able to enjoy annual staged productions of some of the most well-known musicals at Brooklyn Theatre in Pretoria.

In order to give audiences a tantalising taste of what’s to come,
FULL HOUSE THEATRE PRODUCTIONS brings you a special concert featuring selections from the Musical Theatre repertoire.

Three of the cast members of My Fair Lady will feature in this concert:

Soprano DEIRDRÉ VAN SCHALKWYK (Mrs Pearce),
Baritone JEAN-PIERRE VERSTER (Freddy Eynsford-Hill)
Baritone CHRISTOPHER VALE (Henry Higgins).
Accompanied by pianist NEIL KROG

Duration: 60 minute concert in total.

Ticket sales:
Fri. 4 Oct. 19:00 / Sat. 5 Oct. 11:00

R150 per person

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033)
Greenlyn Village Centre
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets
Menlo Park

October Night Market @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 5 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

On Saturday 5 October 17:00 – 21:00 

Spring has sprung and we will be having the first night market on the 5th of October 2019 from 5pm – 9pm. Usual morning market from 8am – 2pm. Bring a blanket, bring chairs but leave your wine and food at home as there will be more than enough.

Hazel Food Market and Arts and Crafts at Greenlyn Village in collaborating with the GauFestival and the City of Tshwane | Official (Page) is hosting the October Night Market at Greenlyn Village.

Featuring more than 80 Arts and Crafts at Greenlyn Village and various food stalls from the Hazel Food Market within the Greenlyn Village Centre. Spring has sprung and we will be having the first night market on the 5th of October 2019 from 5pm – 9pm. Usual morning market from 8am – 2pm. Bring a blanket, bring chairs but leave your wine and food at home as there will be more than enough.

The Arts and Crafts at Greenlyn Village 

 – the Rainbow Country at its best!

Written by Prof. Piet Meiring

If you want to know a country and meet its people as they really are, go and find a street market in London, Amsterdam, Berlin or New York.  You will see it all, right before your eyes! It happens in South Africa as well.  Do you want to experience the Rainbow Country and its people, at their most festive and charming, make your way to the Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn, in Pretoria.

Entering the gates on a typical Saturday morning, you find yourself walking into a food market with stalls catering to every conceivable taste and thirst. The real treat, however, is wandering through the arts and crafts market, together with thousands of visitors, local as well as from overseas, discovering the beauty and the colours of South Africa.  Walking up and down the lanes – Pepper Lane, Willow Lane, Acacia Lane or Garden Route Lane – you may browse at more than seventy stalls. 

A wide variety of crafts from all over South Africa as well as from other African countries is on offer. While admiring the multi-coloured paintings and elegant sculptures, you may be able to talk to the artists themselves, who will gladly discuss their works with you. For the ladies and the girls there are gold jewellery to admire, together with colourful beadwork, copper bracelets, beautifully painted cloth, as well as hand crafted porcelain. And for the men and the boys there is a variety of home-made wooden guns and slings, leather work and exquisite, soft, Nguni-skin carpets. 

And, if you have to send a letter to your mother in law, paper made from elephant dung may come in handy! For the health-conscious, a number of stalls are devoted to herbs and medicines and creams, for every taste and every ill.

The heart of the market is the Brooklyn Theatre, where local as well as international artists regularly perform. The theatre and its productions are lauded by many as an important contributor the weekly South African musical calendar. Often on a Saturday morning visitors to the market are invited to a Limelight Concert, where budding artists and youth choirs demonstrate their skills during 20-40 minute programmes. 

The iSalon Music Shop, part of the theatre complex, boasts the largest selection of classical, popular-classical as well as Jazz CDs and DVDs. And if you are searching for sheet music or for instruments, from a simple recorder to a grand piano, this is the address you want.

The Arts and Crafts Market at Greenlyn is at the corner of Edison Street and Mc Kenzie Street in Brooklyn, in easy access from the main traffic arteries in Pretoria.

For more information, please contact us by phone 060 976 8113 or by e-mail artsandcraftsatgreenlyn@gmail.com.

 

MISS LATINA SOUTH AFRICA @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 5 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

MISS LATINA SOUTH AFRICA – empowering the youth – focus to reach male and female youth of all socioeconomic status of the rainbow nation of South Africa. With their talents on fashion designers, chef, dancers, photographers, speech, inner beauty, etc. and at the same time the richness root of the Latin culture is exhibited to the South Africa Community. All this will help them in their self-steam and to achieve their dreams as their inner beauty awake in every participant and by doing so, their serving attitude and values will arise to make a long-life impact on and in their communities.

SHOW NAME: Miss Latina South Africa
SHOW DATE: Saturday, 05 Oct 2019
START TIME:18:00 Latino Food Judge & 19:00 Cultura Latina Fashion
DURATION:  180mins
VENUE:     The Brooklyn Theatre, Pretoria
PRICES:    R100.00

For ticketsales please contact Lupita

R100 per person

Marlin Lupita Lancho Perea
Miss Latina South Africa
Tel: 073 130 1475
Email: lupita@latinoworld.co.za

HAZEL FOOD MARKET @ Greenlyn Village
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

At Hazel Food Market we continue to provide you with the best food products Pretoria has to offer and aim to always offer exciting new tastes to make your Saturday mornings something to look forward to.

 

BE A BETTER DOG @ SA State Theatre
Oct 5 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

THE SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH AFRICAN TREE PRODUCTIONS

Brings You
BE A BETTER DOG

Pretoria 
320 Pretorius Street
Momentum Theatre

Date: 01-06 October 2019

    Written By:Makhubalo Ikaneng
    Directed and performed By:Seiphemo Motswiri

The South African State Theatre in association with African Tree Productions brings you a one man show titled “BE A BETTER DOG”. The show tells a tale of Dog’s life while at the same time we get to see the world we live in through the eyes of a dog. This one man play raises questions that challenge humans to self introspect. The play is an entire re-enactment of the dog’s solid life with commentary on its several social issues as it interacted with its various owners.  

The play uses humour and light commentary to speak to otherwise sensitive issues of class, care and abandonment as applied and taken up by the human being in an attempt to tackle life challenges. As a dog he grapples with questions such as to what extent is he a happy animal, and to what extent is he a traumatized orphan of human caused condition? Is any of it his own making and what power did he as dog have to change the situation? These are poignant questions that are relevant to a human world that is at crossroads with questions of destructive violence, corruption, injustice, racial discrimination, lack of care to the planet in and its inhabitants in general. In life we strive to be better human beings, but what does it mean to be better? And what does it take to be better? The show was part of United Solo festival 2018 in New York where it received 5 Star review on Solo Critics’ Choice. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, directed and performed by Seiphemo Motswiri. Be A Better Dog opens at Sibusiso Queenana Theatre stage at State Theatre on 1 October 2019. 

Tickets can be purchased via WebTickets https://www.webtickets.co.za/mobi/event.aspx?itemid=1489181694

 

By Kia Standard

What makes a better dog? Is it loyalty, integrity, or courage? “Be A Better Dog” chronicles the life of a lovable canine that grows up in a small town outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. Written by Makhubalo Ikaneng, this tale is told in the great tradition of oldfashioned storytelling. Actor Seiphemo Motswiri plays the lovable pup. Dressed in a tan tshirt, armygreen sweatpants, and white Converse sneakers, he leaps onto the stage, panting enthusiastically.

And the audience is immediately hooked.
 
The dog’s mother Sophie gets pregnant by a police guard dog, and after she has her litter, each puppy is promptly given away to various people in the town. The dog’s first owner Timbe lives next door to the owner of the dog’s mother; however, he is never allowed to see her and barks at her through a fence. Timbe names his new puppy Danger, and ties him to a pole in the backyard. Timbe was once a high roller in Johannesburg, surrounded by wealth and women.

After losing his fortune, he bitterly returns to the town, and takes out his aggression on the dog. When Timbe wins the lottery and moves to the suburbs, he takes Danger with him. Danger is still chained to a pole, but in nicer surroundings. Timbe squanders his fortune within three months, and after his house and belongings are repossessed, the dog is taken away from him.
 
Danger’s new owner treats him better. His name is Ron Pete and he has a scruffy beard.

He renames the dog Condo. Ron Pete reads the newspaper and complains about “the white genocide” plaguing South Africa. Ron Pete’s biggest fear is that black people will move into his neighbourhood. One day a black family moves nearby, and the shock causes Ron Pete to have a heart attack. He leaves Condo to his son Simon and daughterinlaw Linda in his will.
 
Simon and Linda spoil Condo and shower him with love and presents.

He gets his own room, his own bowl, and more toys than he knows what to do with. However, when Simon is at work, Linda has a daily visitor named Uncle. Uncle is not fond of Condo. He’s nice when Linda is around, but mean to the dog whenever she leaves the room. A few months later, Linda finds out she is pregnant. Condo is unexpectedly removed from his plush surroundings, and Simon chains him to a pole in the backyard. The rain is intense and Condo becomes feverish.

He is taken to a vet, who gives him a shot from a sharp needle. When he wakes up he finds himself alone on the side of a busy highway.
 
He wanders for a few days and follows a few men who are walking to work. One man complains that their employers treat them “no better than a dog.” A dog himself, Condo wonders what that statement means. The men are mine workers, and a security guard named Solomon takes a liking to Condo and adopts him.

Solomon was once a mine worker but after an injury, his managers gave him a job at the gate. A few days later there is a strike and Solomon and Condo are caught in the middle. The other employees are angry because Solomon continues to work. There is a raid on the offices and Condo tries his best to protect his owner. He promises to “be a better dog.”
 
Seiphemo Motswiri’s acting is engaging.

He physicalizes the dog with rounded paw hands, leaps of enthusiasm, and a laughing bark. He also seamlessly transitions between each of the human characters’ vocal timbres, postures, and kinetic movements. There were times when I wanted to dance to the rhythm of the show’s South African beats and sing along with him.

To sum up his performance in one word: Joyous!
 
“Be a Better Dog” presents social commentary not only reflecting how human beings treat their animals, but also how human beings treat each other. It teaches us to be a better friend, a better partner, and a better citizen. Just “be a better dog.”

“BE A BETTER DOG”
Performed by Seiphemo Motswiri
Nov. 16 at 7:30pm
Writer: Makhubalo Ikaneng
Stage Manager: Ikobeng Moatlhodi
Show Image by Sello Maepa, courtesy of the production
United Solo 2018
Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
New York City
Review link By Alex News
Olive Tree Theatre

http://alexnews.co.za/86549/manala35theatre/#.WHzHl_IPlSA.gmail

Mixed Messages
Be a Better Dog was showcased from 18 to 21 August and displayed the raw, imaginative and spellbinding creativity of the sole actor, Alex Seiphemo. He exposes the deep, intricate, entrapping and confusing social challenges deriving from the lack of a life script.

This through the eyes of a dog who acts in such a way to depict a human growing through confusing signals about the good and the bad in life within the family, immediate and distant community of parents, siblings and friends.
Audiences are led through a journey of uncertain love, inconsistent family unity and support, crime, race and class conflict, poverty and affluence which all fail to clarify the essence of life in a society of the have and the have-nots, the poor and the rich, black and white, female and male all struggling for the true meaning of life.
Be a Better Dog also featured at this year’s annual, world-renowned Grahamstown Theatre Festival and may be repeated at Olive Tree Theatre later this year.
Be a Better Dog [27 November 2016]
Wits Theatre SoSolo Festival
STANLEY-CARL DU-PONT

Seiphemo Motswiri in “Be a Better Dog” at the So Solo Theatre Festval at Wits Theatre gave a truly outstanding performance, well worth seeing more than once!

Oct
6
Sun
PARK ACOUSTICS AT FORT SCHANSKOP @ Fort Schanskop
Oct 6 @ 10:00 am – 6:30 pm

SUNDAY – 29 September 2019 – PRETORIA

Park Acoustics and Pringles proudly invites legendary SA front man Arno Carstens along with rock & roll legends Shadowclub, Pretoria blues rock super group Black Cat Bones, Cape Town’s finest Crimson House, The Valley, The Rob Father & DJ Lemon!!

It’s also a massive honour to host Loyiso Madinga, Donovan Goliath and Chris Mapane on the comedy floor!

*COMBAT sexual assault and violence towards woman and children. Rapecrises.org.za has a justice department that is campaigning for the return and expansion of Sexual Offenses Courts which focuses on prosecuting sexual offenders and assisting victims during the court procedures and making them feel safe. According to their stats less than 20% of sexual assault cases land in court and less than 10% ends up with a conviction. 45 000 reported cases were unsolved last year. The majority of Rape Crises work is supporting Rape victims. They need financial support. Check out the website and make a donation. We’ve also added a donation button on Plankton when purchasing a Parks ticket. For every Rand you donate we will match your Rand for the first R5000.

Please note – No children between the age 13-17 will be allowed at the event. Proof of identification required, no copies, photo’s or temporary documents. Also no glass are permitted into the festival area, please buy cans or decant in plastic bottles.

Park Acoustics program:

=====================
Pringles Main Stage
=====================
11:00 The Valley
12:05 Crimson House
13:10 Black Cat Bones
14:15 Shadowclub
15:30 Arno Carstens
16:45 The Robfather vs DJ Lemon

==================
Sunset Comedy Stage
===================
Loyiso Madinga
Donovan Goliath
Chris Mapane

=====
Price:
=====
R135 Early bird (Only 500 available)
R155 Online Online (www.parkacoustics.co.za)
R175 Gate

Free for children under the age of 6 (six)
R15 per vehicle, (paid at the main entrance to the nature reserve)

==============
Prohibited items:
==============
Weapons
Illegal substances
Domestic animals
Bad vibes

===============
Facilities available:
===============
Two stages
Bar
Food stalls
Toilets
Soft green grass
360° view of Pretoria
Nature trails for hiking and mountain biking
Voortrekker Monument (pay separately)

DISCLAIMER:
You enter the premises and surrounding facilities at your own risk. Park Acoustics cc, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors and management will not be responsible for any death, loss, injury and / or damage of any nature whatsoever, irrespective how such death, loss, injury and / or damage occurs, regardless whether such death, loss, injury and / or damage is caused through any act or omission by Park Acoustics cc, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors or management.

DISCLAIMER:
You enter the premises and surrounding facilities at your own risk. Park Acoustics cc, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors and management will not be responsible for any death, loss, injury and / or damage of any nature whatsoever, irrespective how such death, loss, injury and / or damage occurs, regardless whether such death, loss, injury and / or damage is caused through any act or omission by Park Acoustics cc, its owners, agents, staff, sponsors or management.

CATHEDRAL MUSIC | Studio Chorale | Marnus Greyling @ Brooklyn Theatre
Oct 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

CATHEDRAL MUSIC
Studio Chorale 
Marnus GreylingVocal and instrumental soloists and organ. A selection of sacred choral music through the ages. Sunday 6 October 15:00
www.brooklyntheatre.co.zaThis exceptional concert conjures up visions of ancient cathedrals, steeples, stained glass windows, rough stone floors, organ pipes and last but not least – angelic choral singing. Studio Chorale, the inn-house chorus at Brooklyn Theatre has now established itself as a force to be reckoned with, after their very successful performance of the Coronation Mass (Mozart) for the 2018 Gaufestival. This was followed up by some fine vocalisation in the opera Norma (Bellini) and the hugely challenging Magnificat (Bach) for the 25th anniversary of Salon Music. Virtuoso organist, repetiteur and chorus master, Marnus Greyling, recently graduated from Cambridge takes charge of Cathedral Music, with a hugely enjoyable selection of sacred works through the ages. This pious musical tour picks up in the Middle-ages with some Pergolesi and Pachelbel, followed by the best of baroque choral fare including a good helping of Bach and Handel, some moving Mozart and Rossini, Schubert and Brahms leading us to late nineteenth century British cathedral composers and placing the listener neatly within reach of the 20th century hits through the likes of John Rutter and Karl Jenkins. 
Henry Balfour-Gardiner – Evening Hymn
John Rutter – The Lord bless you and keep you
CHH Parry – Jerusalem
Jonathan Battishill – O Lord look down from heaven
César Franck – Panis Angelicus
CHH Parry – Long since in Egypt’s plenteous land
Anton Bruckner – Abendlied
Felix Mendelssohn – O for the wings of a dove (with Soprano soloist – moontlik Deidré?)
CHH Parry – I was glad
John Rutter – A Gaelic blessing

Ticket sales:Sunday 6 October 15:00

Block A (Adult) – R180
Block A Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R150

Block B (Adult) – R130
Block B Senior(60+) / Student(21-) – R100

BOOK NOW

Brooklyn Theatre (012 460 6033) 
Greenlyn Village Centre 
C/o Thomas Edison and 13th Streets 
Menlo Park

Fotostaatmasjien Oorgeklank. Willemien en Jude Harpstar @ Pierneefteater
Oct 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm


Fotostaatmasjien Oorgeklank

Willemien en Jude Harpstar

Sondag 6 Oktober 2019  15h00
R120 per persoon
012 329 0709 of info@pierneefteater.co.za

60 minute

Pouse:  Nee

Die woorde in Bibi Slippers se bekroonde digbundel word nou ook oorgeklank. Kunstenaars Willemien & Jude HarpStar het saamgespan om ’n klompie alternatiewe Afrikaanse toonsettings van die gedigte te skep wat die teks naboots, oormaak en herinterpreteer op klavier, sintetiseerder & harp.

Fotostaatmasjien Oorgeklank

Die woorde in Bibi Slippers se bekroonde digbundel word nou ook oorgeklank. Kunstenaars Willemien& Jude HarpStar het saamgespan om ’n klompie alternatiewe Afrikaanse toonsettings van die gedigte te skep wat die teks naboots, oormaak en herinterpreteer. Kom luister na ’n program wat Bibi se woordkuns (vasgevang op video) met Jude & Willemien se toonsettings en musikale avonture op harp en klavier kombineer.

Jude HarpStar  

Musikant Jude HarpStar, ‘n semi-finalis (top 18) in “SA’s got talent 2014”, het haar musiekopleiding in die VSA ontvang en verskeie toekennings ingepalm. Sy is die solo pianis op die album Øyeblikk van Caroline Leisegang, wat deur Sony Music geteken is en die   “Africa iTunes Classical Album of The Year 2015” gewen het. Die duo LU FLUR waarin sy gespeel het ook onlangs twee internasionale toekenninge gewen: “Best Acoustic Song” and “Best Pop/Adult/Contemporary EP” as deel van die “Independent Music Awards” kategorie. Paul Boekkooi het haar op die volgende manier beskryf: “arguably the most versatile and both technically and musically one of the most inspiring harpists in South Africa…”

Facebook: Jude HarpStar

Instagram: @judeharpstar_official

Website: www.judeharpstar.biz

Willemien/Philomène&

Willemien/Philomène Rust beskryf haarself as ‘n kruising tussen ‘n alternatiewe Afrikaanse liedjieskrywer en ‘n kreatiewe entrepreneur. Sy het ‘n Meesters in Frans aan die Universiteit van Pretoria verwerf en het tot 2016 Frans as vak aangebied. Sy is sedert 2017 op ‘n creative sabbatical en besig met ‘n verskeidenheid musiekproduksies in samewerking met ander kunsinniges: Twee hartstale en Francophonix (saam met Adelle Nqeto, Pieter Bezuidenhout & James Robb) Klanbord (saam met chef Renette Vosloo) asook Fotostaatmasjien Oorgeklank (saam met Jude HarpStar).

Facebook: Willemien& | Philomène&

Instagram: @philo.mien

Website : www.philomien.co.za